FAQs

  1. How do I sign up as a Career Advisor?
  2. What is the Career Advisor Program?
  3. Who should become a Career Advisor?
  4. What are my obligations as a Career Advisor?
  5. What are the ways a Career Advisor can help?
  6. I'm not a hiring manager within my organization. Can I still get involved as a Career Advisor?
  7. Can I recommend someone I think would be a good Career Advisor? How?

1. How do I sign up as a Career Advisor?

Visit our Compass registration page for step-by-step instructions on creating your account. Then go to www.willamettealumni.com to get started.  You can become a Career Advisor by turning on your Career Advisor profile in "Your Advisor Profile" under the "Career Network" heading. Or, fill out and return this form to Stacey Lane.

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2. What is the Career Advisor Program?

The Career Advisor program is part of the Alumni Career Network at Willamette.  Career Advisors are alumni and parent volunteers.  It’s a great way to be a part of the Willamette community.   Career Advisors are used as points of contact for current upperclassmen or alumni whose interests, majors or situations match the unique job experiences and expertise of our Career Advisors.

Advisors can customize the extent to which they're involved, but whatever time and energy they offer will be well-placed.  Even if they're never contacted, rest-assured that students use the career path information to help them answer the "What can I do with a major in _____?" question.  Career Advisors provide a level of comfort in the uncertain realm of the job search.

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3. Who should become a Career Advisor?

Any who has held a job or had a career has valuable career information!  When you complete your Career Advisor profile, you offer a unique opportunity to alumni and students to:

  • Learn about career paths they might not have considered.
  • Find new professional organizations they can join.
  • Make connections when they relocate geographically. Remember how hard it was finding your way around a new town?
  • Get valuable career advice when making a career decision.
  • Transition successfully from school to the world of work.

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4. What are my obligations as a Career Advisor?

We appreciate your willingness to be involved, so we’ve tried to make it as easy as possible for parents to be of service. You can set the number of times you’re willing to be contacted, and you have the ability to make your profile inactive at any time. You can specify what types of career-related activities to be involved with, as well as topics you’d be willing to discuss.

There's one thing that we don't expect Advisors to do:  make job offers.  Career Advisors are allies and advocates, not recruiters; any graduating students or alumni who contact you for networking or guidance will know this.

How often you’re contacted will depend on how complete your Advisor profile is. We know that the more detail you offer, the more we’ll be able to informally and formally connect alumni and students to you. Even if you’re never contacted directly, know that a complete profile provides valuable information for alumni and students. Better than any book or career guide, real world career experiences of our Advisors can be an incredible source of guidance.  

As we look for volunteers to serve on career panels or help with career programming (e.g. networking skills for students), our career Advisors will be the first people we look to for expertise.

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5. What are the ways a Career Advisor can help?

Depending on the career needs of the student and/or alumnus who contacts you, you might find that you can provide guidance around:

  1. Self-assessment: Helping identify, combine and apply career values, transferable skills, specialized knowledge, career interests, personality preferences to career choices/paths.  
  2. Career/occupational research: Assisting in gaining accurate information about the careers/jobs that interest the student/alumnus. This might include sharing printed/online resources, networking events, professional organizations, contacts, experiential opportunities, or tradeshows/conferences.
  3. Networking: Helping to expand their professional network. Advisors are available for informational interviews and often can provide referrals to colleagues/contacts. Consider going to a networking event or a professional organization with a student and/or alumnus.
  4. Experiential learning: Often the best way to make a decision about a career choice is to get some hands-on experience. Career Advisors often have insider knowledge about job shadowing, volunteering, internships and part-time job opportunities. 
  5. Application material preparation: Developing an industry or position-specific resume and cover letter, or critiquing writing samples and offering input on a student’s and/or alumnus’ professional portfolio.

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6. I'm not a hiring manager within my organization. Can I still get involved as a Career Advisor?

Absolutely. We make it quite clear to alumni and students that Career Advisors aren’t expected to find others jobs.

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7. Can I recommend someone I think would be a good Career Advisor? How?

We hope you’ll spread the word to other alumni! If there is someone that you’d like to recommend, you can email Stacey Lane, who will follow-up with a personal invitation to join the Career Network.

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