Scheduling, Events and Conferences

Top 10 Things To See and Do On The Willamette University Campus

  1. Star Trees
  2. Cone Chapel in Waller Hall
  3. Justice Statue
  4. Goudy Commons / Bon Appetit
  5. Martha Springer Botanical Garden
  6. Mill Race
  7. Hallie Ford Museum of Art
  8. Hatfield Library
  9. Bistro Willamette
  10. Impossible Triangle
  11. Worth Learning More...

1. Star Trees

The five giant sequoias were planted north of Collins Science Hall by President Knopf in 1942 to honor Willamette University’s centennial celebration. If you stand in the center of the trees and look upward, the trees frame a star shaped view of the sky, creating a "Temple for the Centuries."

[back to top]

2. Cone Chapel in Waller Hall

The second floor of Stately Waller Hall is dedicated to the Cone Chapel, a favorite venue for Willamette Valley Weddings. The Chapel accommodates up to 300 and features a magnificent pipe organ and is accented by unique stained glass.  The lovely setting is also utilized for lectures and Student programing.

[back to top]

3. Justice Statue

This unusually clear eyed Lady of Justice once stood atop the Marion County Courthouse from 1906 -1952 when it was donated to the WU College of Law by the Marion County commissioners. The statue now greets visitors just inside the entrance of the Truman Wesley Collins Legal Center.

[back to top]

4. Goudy Commons / Bon Appetit

Our campus food service features local ingredients and a commitment to sustainable practices. Our largest campus dinning option was made famous when celebrity chef Rachel Ray enjoyed Goudy Common’s Thursday lunchtime small plates while filming her $40 a day Food Channel show. (Episode AD1D03)

[back to top]

5. Martha Springer Botanical Garden

Dedicated in 1988 in honor of emeritus professor Martha Springer, the garden is fulfillment of the inspiration and hard work of a group of professors, students and staff. Over a third of the garden is dedicated to Oregon native plants.

[back to top]

6. Mill Race

This landmark waterway runs the full length of campus and was once diverted for use by the Thomas Kay Woolen Mill. At the beginning of the academic year, incoming freshmen join in a Willamette tradition by placing floating candles in the stream during their matriculation ceremony. Four years later on Graduation day the CLA Seniors process along the same stretch of the stream enroute to their Commencement ceremony.

[back to top]

7. Hallie Ford Museum of Art

Willamette University's Art Museum was founded in 1998 and designed to support the liberal arts curriculum of Willamette University and to serve as an intellectual and cultural resource for Salem and beyond.

[back to top]

8. Hatfield Library

Willamette University's College of Liberal Arts library was dedicated in 1986 in honor of Oregon's former senator, Willamette alumnus, teacher and administrator - Mark O. Hatfield.

[back to top]

9. Bistro Willamette

This student run coffee shop was founded in 1986 and is seeped in WU tradition. The handmade treats and espresso drinks are all prepared by WU students using recipes passed down by decades of dedicated Bistro crews. This vibrant community treasure also features live music, open mics, student art shows, poetry readings and intimate lectures.

[back to top]

10. Impossible Triangle

Physic professor Maurice Stewart designed this unique sculpture located on the northern shore of the Mill Race. Go to the second floor balcony on the North side of the Putnam University Center and as you move into position watch this sculpture transform through optical illusion, into a triangle which “can’t be made".

[back to top]

11. Worth Learning More...

Lausanne Hall - Built in 1920, the three story red-brick and stone accented structure was created to be a "commodious, modern dormitory for women." Erected to replace Chloe Clark Willson's former home that had been moved two blocks to the Willamette campus in 1880 and became Willamette Women's College. Both structures were named Lausanne Hall for the sailing ship Lausanne, which brought 53 additional volunteers, and much needed supplies in 1839, proving crucial in aiding the Methodist mission and the founding of Willamette University. Renovated in 1996 this coed hall houses 152 Liberal Arts students during the academic year and welcomes hundreds of high school and middle school students attending youth camps each summer.

Zena Forest - 305 acres of ecologically diverse and historically significant land purchased by Willamette University from the Trust for Public Lands in 2008. The Willamette University Forest at Zena includes habitats of oak and mixed species woodland, riparian areas, grassland areas, wetlands, freshwater aquatic areas, and forest plantations as well as viable farming land. *If you are part of the Willamette Community and are interested in utilizing Willamette University Forest at Zena, please fill out the Zena Forest Event Request Form or contact Dr. Karen Arabas, Associate Director of Land Conservation and Research at <karabas> or x6666.

Ford Hall - Dedicated in 2009, the $19.6 million academic building was designed to last 100 years and welcomes an unusual mix of disciplines not routinely found under one roof. Ford Hall exemplifies Willamette University's dedication to sustainability and has earned gold certification from the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program of the U.S. Green Building Council.

[back to top]