AP and IB Policy

College Courses for Credit in High School

Willamette University encourages student participation in the Advanced Placement (AP) program sponsored by the College Board. All AP scores of "4" and "5" will be granted a minimum of one credit (4 semester hours). For a current listing of AP course equivalencies, visit the Registrar's Office website.

The University also encourages participation in the International Baccalaureate (IB) program as offered in many schools overseas and, increasingly, in the United States. Willamette will grant one credit (4 semester hours) for each IB Higher Level examination passed with a score of "5" and two credits each for Higher Level exams passed with a score of "6" or "7." Willamette will also grant one additional credit to students who earn the full IB Diploma with a score of 30 or above. For a current listing of IB course equivalencies, visit the Registrar's Office website.

Application of Credits

A maximum of eight credits total may be earned from the AP and IB programs. This credit may be applied to major and minor programs with the approval of the academic departments concerned. Credit earned based on AP or IB scores may not be used to satisfy Mode of Inquiry (MOI) requirements.

College credits earned prior to secondary school graduation in concurrent enrollment programs may transfer to Willamette University if the credits are earned in regularly scheduled college classes taught by college professors to classes of primarily degree-seeking college students. Such courses must be more advanced in the discipline than courses normally offered at the secondary school. In order to be eligible for transfer the college courses must be described in the college catalog. College credit is not awarded for college courses taught at the high school.

In preparing for enrollment at Willamette University, secondary school students should have four years of college preparatory study including English, mathematics, foreign languages, history or social studies, and laboratory science. Secondary school students who take college courses that are replacements for courses available in their secondary school are considered to be doing their college preparatory work outside the secondary school curriculum, rather than accumulating credit toward the baccalaureate degree. Therefore, introductory courses taken at a college instead of a secondary school are viewed as college preparatory work outside the secondary school curriculum, rather than accumulating credit toward the baccalaureate degree. Credits that apply to the secondary school diploma cannot be applied a second time to the baccalaureate degree.

Secondary school students who have completed an introductory course offered at their secondary school and who go on to do more advanced study in that subject at a college may earn baccalaureate transfer credit if their secondary school does not offer more advanced courses in that subject. No college credit is granted for the College Level Examination Program (CLEP).

College credits earned prior to secondary school graduation that do not fall under the above specific policies are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Secondary school students should consult the Office of Admission or Office of the Registrar with any questions regarding the transferability of college credits earned prior to high school graduation. Under no circumstances will more than eight Willamette credits (the equivalent of 32 semester or 48 quarter credit hours) be granted for credit completed prior to secondary school graduation.