For Students

Exchange Programs - Tips & Information

This page includes important information and tips for Willamette Early Career/Career Change MBA students interested in participating in our international exchange programs.

  1. Career Management
  2. Cost and Expenses
  3. Financial Aid
  4. Passport
  5. Student Visa - Fall Semester
  6. Student Visa - Summer Semester Exchange Program
  7. Travel Arrangements
  8. Housing
  9. Health Insurance
  10. Ability in the Country's Language
  11. Communicating with the Exchange Institution
  12. Maintaining Eligibility after Arrival at the Exchange Institution

1. Career Management

Exchange students should plan ahead to be sure their job search continues to progress while on exchange. Exchange students can keep up with the activities of the career management office via email and the Internet, develop a network of contacts in their career area of interest prior to departure, and maintain communication with contacts while abroad.

Students selected to participate in an exchange program must have completed the career management section of GSM 5108, and meet with Beth Ursin, Director of Career Management, before departure to discuss their job search plan for the period of exchange.

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2. Cost and Expenses

Exchange students pay tuition and fees for the Willamette MBA program to Willamette University for the semester of exchange. No additional tuition is payable to the exchange school. Some programs may have secondary fees for computer use, etc. Students are responsible for all personal expenses during the exchange semester. The cost of living and standard of living varies with the country. Typical expenses for which you should plan include but are not limited to:

  • Airfare
  • Country entry fees (if required)
  • Textbooks and course packs
  • Living, accommodation, food, entertainment, etc.
  • Travel
  • Health Insurance
  • Immunizations (if required)
  • Passport and Visa fees and travel (if required)
  • Local student fees

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3. Financial Aid

Summer Exchange Students: MBA students on exchange for summer semester are enrolled as Willamette MBA students while on exchange, so your financial aid will be awarded as if you were spending fall semester at Willamette. Adjustments to financial aid budget limits may be possible to help cover air fare, etc. Be sure to see Katy O'Neil , Senior Financial Aid Counselor, at the Willamette University Financial Aid Office.

Fall Semester Exchange Students: MBA students on exchange for fall semester are enrolled as Willamette MBA students while on exchange, so your financial aid will be awarded as if you were spending fall semester at Willamette. Adjustments to financial aid budget limits may be possible to help cover air fare, etc. Be sure to see Katy O'Neil , Senior Financial Aid Counselor, at the Willamette University Financial Aid Office.

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4. Passport

All exchange students need a Passport. If you do not have a Passport, apply for your Passport now. A valid U.S. passport or passport from your country of citizenship is required to enter and leave most countries and to apply for a visa. If you do have a Passport, be sure it is valid for at least 3 months beyond the end of the exchange semester. If it is not valid for 3 months beyond the program, renew your Passport now. Information about the application and renewal process for U.S. Passports is available on the U.S. Department of State website.

Another helpful site is the U.S. Passport section of VisaHQ.com

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5. Student Visa - Fall Semester

Students selected for a fall semester exchange program must apply for and receive a visa.  Students will receive documents needed to apply for a visa from the host institution. Students are responsible for submitting the required documents to the appropriate governmental agencies in a timely manner. Be sure to refer to the country's embassy web site for up-to-date information about visas.

Students going to Denmark for fall semester will need a Residence Permit from Denmark. Instructions on how to apply for a Residence Permit as a student are available at http://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-us/coming_to_dk/studies/how_to_apply.htm. More information about the residence permit is available at http://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-us/coming_to_dk/Residence_cards_biometric/residence_cards_biometric.htm. Another great resource is Study Denmark at http://studyindenmark.dk/ and their all-topic guide avaialble at http://studyindenmark.dk/guides/all-topics/download-pdf

Students going to France for fall semester must have a visa from France. French visa information is available at the Campus France website http://www.usa.campusfrance.org/en/page/getting-started,the Embassy of France website http://www.consulfrance-sanfrancisco.org/spip.php?article1800, and http://www.info-france-usa.org/spip.php?rubrique102. Students must go to a French Consulate to apply in person for the visa. The closest French Consulate is in San Francisco.  Students must have made their return flight reservations before they apply for a visa.

Another helpful site for information about visa requirements based on your country of citizenship and your country of destination is the visa section of VisaHQ.com

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6. Student Visa - Summer Semester Exchange Program

Students who are U.S. citizens who participate in the summer exchange programs in Denmark or France do not need to get a visa for a summer exchange if there stay overseas is less than 90 days.

If you are not a U.S. citizen and planning to go to Denmark for the summer exchange program (less than 90 days) see http://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-us/coming_to_dk/visa/need_visa/who_needs_visa.htm

If you are not a U.S. citizen and planning to go to France for the summer exchange program (less than 90 days) see http://www.consulfrance-sanfrancisco.org/spip.php?article2690

Another helpful site for information about visa requirements based on your country of citizenship and your country of destination is the visa section of VisaHQ.com

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7. Travel Arrangements

Exchange students must make and pay for their own travel arrangements. Students planning to go to France must have made reservations for their return flight to the U.S. before they apply for the visa. Two web sites found helpful by previous exchange students are statravel.com (for student fares) and kayak.com (features data from a variety of travel sites).

Consider purchasing a Eurail Pass for travel around Europe.

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8. Housing

Some exchange institutions have student housing available to exchange students, at varying costs. At other locations, you will need to live in local housing. The host exchange institution may provide assistance in locating housing.

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9. Health Insurance

Participating exchange students will be required to carry adequate health insurance as per the rules and regulations of the host exchange institution. When approved by the host exchange institution, students may be eligible to use Willamette's student health insurance or their private insurance coverage while on exchange. Willamette's student health insurance will be valid for the fall semester of exchange, as long as the student has registered and paid fall semester tuition and fees (including health insurance) to Willamette University. The Willamette plan covers health expenses, emergency medical airlifting and repatriation of remains. Students with private insurance coverage should be sure to check with the insurance carrier about coverage while abroad. The plan may not cover health expenses while abroad, emergency medical airlifting or repatriation of remains. Supplemental policies for medical evacuation and repatriation are available. International students should contact Chris Andresen about health insurance issues.

It is not always possible to bill insurance directly while abroad. Exchange students should plan to pay out of pocket for any health expenses incurred while abroad, get medical receipts and seek reimbursement from insurance after returning to campus.

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10. Ability in the Country's Language

Exchange courses are taught in English, but the degree of ability in the local language required at each school varies. English is widely spoken in some countries and less so in others. However, in all cases, some ability in the local language will help exchange students get the most from their experience.

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11. Communicating with the Exchange Institution

The exchange institution will contact students and ask them to complete an application form and provide other supplemental information. All forms and requests for information should be completed as soon as possible and returned to the exchange partner school.

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12. Maintaining Eligibility after Arrival at the Exchange Institution

Exchange students must comply with the following to maintain their eligibility for enrollment in the exchange program after arrival at the exchange institution:

  1. maintain good standing within the exchange partner's, Willamette University's and the Atkinson School's codes of conduct
  2. provide the Associate Dean/Director of Admission the following information by the end of the first week of study at the exchange institution:
    • a list of the courses for which the student is registered at the exchange institution, including the course number, course title, and number of ECTS credits per course
    • telephone number at which the student can be reached while on exchange
    • mailing address and living address at which the student can be reached in the exchange country
    • email address at which the student can be reached while on exchange
  3. provide an official copy of the student's exchange school transcript following completion of the exchange program
The exchange institution will contact students and ask them to complete an application form and provide other supplemental information. All forms and requests for information should be completed as soon as possible and returned to the exchange partner school.

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