Current Exhibition

The 60s: Pop and Op Art Prints from the Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

May 13 – October 22, 2017

Print Study Center

The 60s: Pop and Op Art Prints from the Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation has been organized by Director John Olbrantz and explores how the Pop and Op art movements, that emerged in the 1960s, had a profound influence on the development of psychedelic posters and fashion.

Looking back, the 1960s was a watershed period in American cultural history. The civil rights, women’s liberation, and LGBTQ movements, as well as the sexual revolution and widespread opposition and polarization to the Vietnam War, led to a search for new societal, cultural, and individual identities. Similarly, the 1960s was an equally important and influential decade in the history of twentieth century art, with the rise of Pop art, Op art, Minimalism, Performance art, Conceptual art, and a host of other movements and styles that would ultimately lead to the emergence of post-modern art in the mid-1970s and beyond. 


Pop Art

Image not availablePop art emerged in Britain in the mid- 1950s and the United States in the late 1950s as a reaction to Abstract Expressionism, which dominated the contemporary art scene at the time. In the capable hands of artists like Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, Pop art presented a challenge to traditions of fine art by including imagery from popular culture, such as advertising, comic books, newspapers, and mundane objects found in everyday life. By the mid to late 1960s, this type of imagery would find creative expression and an outlet in the posters of Rick Griffin, Alton Kelley, Stanley Mouse, Bonnie MacLean, and Wes Wilson, among others.


Op Art

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Like Pop art, Op art represented a revolt in the 1960s against what younger artists considered the long, almost tyrannical dominance of Abstract Expressionism. Unlike Pop art which drew on imagery from popular culture, however, Op art was a style of abstraction that relied on geometric shapes, lines, and color juxtapositions to create optical illusions for the viewer. Gaining popularity in the mid-1960s, the Op art movement was driven by American artists like Joseph Albers and Richard Anuszkiewicz who were interested in investigating various perceptual effects. Albers’ exploration of color theory at Yale University in particular would have a profound effect on his student Victor Moscoso, who would carry the lessons of his teacher to San Francisco in the 1960s and influence a whole generation of poster artists.


Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

The Pop and Op art prints on view are drawn from the collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation. Jordan purchased his first work of art when he was fourteen years old from the Fountain Gallery, the first contemporary art gallery in Portland, which was owned and operated by his mother Arlene Schnitzer. It was through his mother’s gallery and his parents’ passion for the visual arts that Jordan turned his initial purchase into a lifelong commitment to collect, share, and promote the visual arts. While Jordan furthers his parents’ legacy of supporting local and regional artists, he began to collect prints and multiples in earnest in 1988, attracted by their technical versatility and collaborative process. Over the past twenty years, he has amassed what is arguably the finest print collection in the United States.


Companion Exhibitions

This exhibition is part of 3 exhibitions that collectively celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love.

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Catch more psychedelic fun with the major exhibition Behind the Beyond: Psychedelic Posters and Fashion, 1966-71, opening June 3 and continuing through August 26, 2017, in the Melvin Henderson-Rubio Gallery and the Maribeth Collins Lobby. 
More information

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The Turned On!: The American Blacklight Poster, 1967-71 exhibition explores the Pop and Op art movements and how they significantly influenced t
he development of psychedelic posters and fashion. This exhibition open on May 13 in the Print Study Center and continues through July 16, 2017. 
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Behind the Beyond Related Events

In conjunction with the Behind the Beyond exhibition, a wide variety of lectures, films, gallery talks, as well as a children’s art camp have been planned.

Lecture
Behind the Beyond: Psychedelic Posters and Fashion in San Francisco, 1966-71
Presented by Gary Westford
Friday, June 2, 2017 at 5 p.m.
Paulus Lecture Hall, Willamette University College of Law
Free and open to the public

Gary Westford will provide a brief overview of the psychedelic music and poster movements in San Francisco, the artists who made them, and their artistic influences. It will include examples of poster work done for Bill Graham’s Fillmore Auditorium, and Chet Helm’s Family Dog, as well as other venues in the city. In addition, he will also explore the blacklight poster movement and touch on the stylistic diversity in fashion, from both hippie and Haute Couture perspectives.

Museum Members Opening Reception
Friday, June 2, 2017, 6 - 8 p.m.
Hallie Ford Museum of Art

Cost
Museum Members and Invited Guests: complimentary
Non-members: $5/person suggested donation at the door

New Members: are welcome to join at the event or online
RSVP Online 
Or by phone at 503-370-6855 or by email at museum-art@willamette.edu

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Lecture
From Seed to Flower: 
The Evolution of the Psychedelic Poster in
San Francisco Before the Summer of Love, 1965-67
Presented by Scott Montgomery
Associate Professor, Art History, University of Denver
Thursday, June 8, 2017 at 7:30 p.m.
Paulus Lecture Hall, Willamette University College of Law
Free and open to the public

Scott Montgomery will trace the origins and development of the psychedelic poster in San Francisco over its initial, formative period, from its embryonic manifestations in “The Seed,” the seminal poster for the Charlatan’s psychedelic residency at the Red Dog Saloon in Virginia City, Nevada, in June 1965, to the full blossoming of the psychedelic style by the onset of The Summer of Love in June 1967. Grounded in the so-called hippie movement, the psychedelic poster emerged as a visual litmus test for being “turned-on” or hip. During this long “Psychedelic Spring,” of June 1965 to June 1967, the psychedelic poster was a primary visual means through which the San Francisco counterculture spoke to itself, fashioning its most powerful artistic visual identity.

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Gallery Talk
Behind the Beyond: Psychedelic Posters and Fashion in San Francisco, 1966-71
Tuesday, June 13, 2017
Presented by Gary Westford
Tours will commence at 12:30 p.m. in the Maribeth Collins Lobby
Free and open to the public

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Film Showing
The 60s: The Years That Shaped a Generation

2005, color, 114 minutes
Thursday, June 22, 2017  |  7 p.m.
Roger Hull Lecture Hall at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art
Free and open to the public

The 1960s was a defining chapter in America's history. It was a time when a generation rebelled and lost its innocence. From the Vietnam War to the struggle for racial equality, and from the sexual revolution to the birth of the counterculture movement, the 1960s was a decade of change, experimentation, and hope that transformed a nation.  

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Kids Summer Art Camp
SUMMER ART BLAST 2017: Feeling Groovy, Making Art 
Hallie Ford Museum of Art 
June 26-30, 2017 
9 a.m. to noon 
Ages 8-12 
Class limit: 10 students 
Pre-registration required by June 9, 2017 
HFMA Members: $108; Non-members: $120 
All supplies provided.

More information

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Gallery Talk
Behind the Beyond: Psychedelic Posters and Fashion in San Francisco, 1966-71
Tuesday, July 11, 2017  | 12:30 p.m.
Presented by Gary Westford
Tours will commence in the Maribeth Collins Lobby
Free and open to the public
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Film Showing
Monterey Pop

1968, color, 78 minutes
Thursday, July 13, 2017 | 7 p.m.
Roger Hull Lecture Hall at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art
Free and open to the public

On a beautiful June weekend in 1967, at the height of the Summer of Love, the first and only Monterey International Pop Festival was presented, ushering in a new era of rock and roll. The pop festival would launch the careers of Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Otis Redding, as well as highlight the extraordinary talents of the Who, the Byrds, and the amazing Ravi Shankar. 

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Film Showing
American Experience: Summer of Love

2007, color, 60 minutes
Thursday, July 27, 2017 | 7 p.m.
Roger Hull Lecture Hall at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art
Free and open to the public

In the summer of 1967, thousands of young people flocked to San Francisco's Haight Ashbury district to join the hippie experience, only to discover that what they had come for was already disappearing. By 1968 the celebration of free love and music had descended into a maelstrom of drug abuse, broken dreams, and violence.

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Film Showing
Gimme Shelter

1970, color, 91 minutes
Rated R
Thursday, August 10, 2017 | 7 p.m.
Roger Hull Lecture Hall at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art
Free and open to the public

Called the greatest rock film ever made, this landmark documentary follows the Rolling Stones on their notorious 1969 U.S. tour, including the bloody clash between members of the Love Generation and a handful of Hell's Angels at a concert at the Altamont Speedway in San Francisco in the summer of 1969 that transformed a decade's dreams into disillusionment.

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Gallery Talk

Behind the Beyond: Psychedelic Posters and Fashion in San Francisco, 1966-71
Tuesday, August 15, 2017  | 12:30 p.m.
Presented by Gary Westford
Tours will commence in the Maribeth Collins Lobby
Free and open to the public


Financial Support

Financial support for the exhibition has been provided by general operating support grants from the City of Salem's Transient Occupancy Tax funds and the Oregon Arts Commission.

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