The Rogers W. Rogers Gallery Exhibitions

[italics]"Flux II", Elise Richman, 2014, Powdered pigment, gum arabic, acrylic, and ink on canvas[/italics]

"Flux II", Elise Richman, 2014, Powdered pigment, gum arabic, acrylic, and ink on canvas

Consilience: Paintings by Elise Richman

August 21 – December 13, 2014

Roger W. Rogers Gallery


[italics]"Where-Wolf (Willamette University)", Andrew Myers, 2014, Mixed media on paper[/italics]

"Where-Wolf (Willamette University)", Andrew Myers, 2014, Mixed media on paper

Where-Wolf (Willamette University): A Drawing Installation by Andrew Myers

January 13 – May 15, 2014

Roger W. Rogers Gallery

The installation includes a large scale half-human, half-wolf figure made from a patchwork of collaged drawings.  The human hands of this hybrid figure hold the ends of two strands of string: one connecting it to the moon, and the other to the diagonal, zig-zag path of OR-7’s journey across an implied map of Oregon...


[italics]"Barbarians at the Gate: Kracklense", Keith Dull, 2012, color reduction relief on paper, 18” x 12”[/italics]

"Barbarians at the Gate: Kracklense", Keith Dull, 2012, color reduction relief on paper, 18” x 12”

Dead Ends & Domestic Talismans: Prints by Keith Dull

August 26 – December 13, 2013

Roger W. Rogers Gallery

Dull employs the visual language of graphic design in his prints. The bright colors, iconic images, and symbols he uses remind us of the images we normally see in manuals and pamphlets, which aim to communicate explicit meaning in a clear and literal way that is immediately accessible to the viewer...


[italics]Her Majesty, Bethany Hays, 2012, watercolor on paper, 34” x 58"[/italics]

Her Majesty, Bethany Hays, 2012, watercolor on paper, 34” x 58"

Piling Up: Paintings by Bethany Hays

January 14 – May 15, 2013

Roger W. Rogers Gallery

Anyone who has ever watched in despair as their home fills with a mountain of laundry waiting to be washed can relate to the recent series of watercolor paintings by Bethany Hays. As a single mother Hays is intimately familiar with the feeling of being swamped by the mundane domestic tasks that are necessary for the everyday maintenance of family life.  Her paintings offer a glimpse into the endless daily battle between entropy and order that characterizes the struggle to tame domestic chaos.


[italics]Nathan Lewis, American, born 1971, "The hand that finds, the hand that feeds, the hand that fails", Installation: sketchbook pages, mixed media 2012[/italics]

Nathan Lewis, American, born 1971, "The hand that finds, the hand that feeds, the hand that fails", Installation: sketchbook pages, mixed media 2012

The Hand That Finds, The Hand That Feeds, The Hand That Fails: An Installation of Sketchbook Drawings by Nathan Lewis

August 28 – December 7, 2012

Roger W. Rogers Gallery

This installation of the sketchbook pages of painter Nathan Lewis provides us with a valuable opportunity to observe the evolution of his work firsthand.  Lewis’s sketchbook is filled with his energetic drawings, compositional studies, technical experiments, anatomical and architectural studies, and copies of masterworks...


[italics]Kendra Larson, "Landscape with trees", 2010, acrylic on wood[/italics]

Kendra Larson, "Landscape with trees", 2010, acrylic on wood

The Geography of Phenomena: Paintings by Kendra Larson

January 13 – May 13, 2012

Roger W. Rogers Gallery

Kendra Larson’s landscapes engage the grand tradition of using depictions of the land as a mirror to reflect our cultural attitudes towards nature, our sense of the geography of memory and identity, and our desire to see the epic of nature as an expression of the sublime...


[italics]Amis Kloof, 2010, iPad Drawing, 24” x 18”[/italics]

Amis Kloof, 2010, iPad Drawing, 24” x 18”

Technology Transforms Tradition: Digital Drawings by Mikko Ijäs

August 15 – December 17, 2011

Roger W. Rogers Gallery

While Mikko Ijäs made the drawings in this exhibition from direct observation in a very traditional manner, the means by which he executed them is anything but traditional: He used his finger to draw them directly on the touch-screen of a portable, digital device.  By combining the disciplined observation and skill of a traditional draftsman or painter with the capabilities of contemporary digital equipment and technology, the works Ijas produces with the Brushes application on an iPhone and iPad are imbued with a startling and productive tension.  His luminous and colorful drawings are simultaneously steeped in the history of art and on the edge of technological innovation...


[italics]"Remains, Bible", Frank Miller, 2009, framed inkjet print, 20" x 30"[/italics]

"Remains, Bible", Frank Miller, 2009, framed inkjet print, 20" x 30"

Remains: Photographs by Frank Miller

January 18 – August 14, 2011

Roger W. Rogers Gallery

In his series “Remains”, Frank Miller finds beauty in ugliness and value in the worthless.  The photographs record discarded consumer items found along the banks of the Willamette River in Salem’s Minto Brown Park, and are characterized by a startling contrast between the verdant landscape and the mundane items of trash that litter it.  Far from presenting the discarded items as ugly and intrusive, Miller has photographed them with a sensitivity that borders on reverence.  It is as if the act of photographing abandoned objects represents an effort to restore their value and dignity...


[italics]“Division Drawings: Fall Creek Tree, 24 of 47 total segments, graphite on paper, 2010"[/italics]

“Division Drawings: Fall Creek Tree, 24 of 47 total segments, graphite on paper, 2010"

Tracing Topographies

October 10 – December 18, 2010

Roger W. Rogers Gallery

In this installation, mixed-media artist Michael Boonstra responds to the landscape of the American West in two very different, but related ways.  He combines a suite of graphite drawings on paper entitled “Division Drawings: Fall Creek Tree (24 of 57 total segments) with a group of inkjet prints of aerial photographs entitled “Spending time in places I have not been... (the drawing we all are creating)”...


[italics]Flying Cloud, Richard Martinez, 2008, alykd, charcoal on duralar, w/eyelets, 26" x 40", 2008[/italics]

Flying Cloud, Richard Martinez, 2008, alykd, charcoal on duralar, w/eyelets, 26" x 40", 2008

Tropic

November 1, 2009 – February 3, 2010

Roger W. Rogers Gallery

At first glance the latest series of drawings by Richard Martinez reads like a tempestuous and fatalistic version of the Lloyd’s shipping register, but the works gradually and subtly reveal themselves to be nuanced meditations on the nature of history and identity.

The mixed-media wet and dry drawings fix dramatic nautical scenes on a frosted but translucent surface as small, austere and minimalist silhouettes.  The restrained palette and minimal treatment seem to deny the inherent romanticism and drama of shipwrecks, voyages of discovery and an elemental struggle against the violence of storms.  It’s as if these seascapes are rendered in a way that embodies the clash between J.M.W. Turner’s paintings of ships outlined against golden, turbulent skies, and the ascetic minimalism of a work by Donald Judd.  The tension between heroic, dramatic subject matter, and cool, formalist execution seem to argue that history is more complicated than any one perspective or depiction might suggest...


[italics]“Disregard How I Feel”, Dennis Raines, 2009, Photo on panel, 11” x 14” x 1.5”[/italics]

“Disregard How I Feel”, Dennis Raines, 2009, Photo on panel, 11” x 14” x 1.5”

The Sordid Life of Toys

October 10 – February 3, 2009

Roger W. Rogers Gallery

While we like to think of childhood as a time of innocence and adventure, it has a darker side.  In childhood we fall prey to a catalogue of fears and terrors.  We fear abandonment, we fear darkness, and we fear the imagined creatures under our beds.  In his black and white images Raines emphasizes this side of being a child.  While the photographs are beautiful, they are also dark and foreboding.  The not so oblique reference to a traumatic incident in Disney’s “Bambi,” in Raines’ work “My mother is dead-finish what you started,” exemplifies this approach...