Course Descriptions

PHYS 110 (NW; QA) Astronomy (1)

An introduction to modern theories of the universe and its evolution. Topics include naked eye observations, the solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Emphasis will be placed on the scientific method and how we understand the universe in terms of basic physical principles. Laboratory.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Understanding the Natural World; Quantitative Requirement
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Dewey-Thorsett, Kleinert, Watkins

PHYS 221 (NW; QA) Introductory Physics I (1)

An introduction to classical mechanics and thermodynamics. In this course students study the concepts and techniques required to measure, describe and predict the motion of particles and extended objects. Topics include kinematics of linear motion, forces and Newton's laws, gravitation, momentum, work, energy, rotational motion, angular momentum, torque, oscillations, temperature, heat, and thermal energy. A laboratory (PHYS 221Y) is associated with this course.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Understanding the Natural World; Quantitative and Analytical Reasoning
  • Prerequisite: MATH 140 or MATH 151 and 152 (or concurrent enrollment)
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Altman, Bigelow, Kleinert, Watkins

PHYS 222 (NW; QA) Introductory Physics II (1)

An introduction to electricity, magnetism, and optics. In this course students study the concepts and techniques required to understand interactions between charged particles as well as light as an electromagnetic wave. Topics include electric force, electric field, electric potential, capacitance, electric current, circuits, magnetic field, inductance, Faraday's law, electromagnetic waves, sound waves, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction and polarization. A laboratory (PHYS 222Y) is associated with this course.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Understanding the Natural World; Quantitative and Analytical Reasoning
  • Prerequisite: PHYS 221 and MATH 140 or MATH 152
  • Offering: Every spring
  • Instructor: Altman, Bigelow, Kleinert, Watkins

PHYS 223 Modern Physics (1)

A survey of the major developments in physics of the 20th century, as well as an introduction to more sophisticated mathematical and laboratory techniques. Topics include special relativity, the quantum nature of light, the wave nature of particles, the Schrödinger equation, atomic physics, molecules, statistical physics, solid state physics, nuclear physics, particle physics and cosmology. A laboratory (PHYS 223Y) is associated with this course.

  • Prerequisite: PHYS 222 and MATH 152
  • Offering: Every fall
  • Instructor: Altman, Bigelow, Kleinert, Watkins

PHYS 250 Physical Biology of the Cell (1)

This course explores how the insights of physics and mathematics have illuminated the complex phenomena of the cell. Students study the use of the quantitative and predictive models to describe biological systems, and discuss the experimental methods that provide the quantitative data required to create and test these methods. The course is structured around a series of case studies involving some of the key players in molecular and cell biology.

  • Prerequisite: MATH 140 or MATH 151 or consent of instructor. 
  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Altman

PHYS 335 Thermal Physics (1)

A study of systems with a large number of particles through the methods of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Topics include the laws of thermodynamics, temperature, heat, thermal equilibrium, equipartition theorem, ideal gas, simple two state systems, entropy, heat engines, free energies, phase transformations, kinetic theory, partition functions, quantum statistics, degenerate Fermi gases, Bose-Einstein condensates, and blackbody radiation.

  • Prerequisite: PHYS 223 and MATH 152
  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Instructor: Altman, Bigelow, Kleinert, Watkins

PHYS 338 Advanced Data Analysis and Simulation (ADAS) (1)

This course focuses on computer data collection and analysis methods for conducting research in experimental physics. Important research skills covered are data collection, simulation of experimental systems, advanced statistical analysis of data, and communication of research results through oral presentations and written reports. The integration of basic physics concepts learned in previous courses will be emphasized. The first part of the course focuses on small-group projects related to current research in the department. The final part of the course focuses on proposing, carrying out, and presenting an independent project.

  • Prerequisite: PHYS 222
  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Watkins

PHYS 339 Mechanics (1)

A study of classical mechanics developed by Newton and reformulated by Lagrange and Hamilton. Topics include vector kinematics and dynamics in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical form, two-body problem, oscillations, Lagrangian mechanics, non-inertial reference frames, coupled oscillation, rigid body motion.

  • Prerequisite: PHYS 222 and MATH 249
  • Offering: Every spring
  • Instructor: Altman, Bigelow, Kleinert, Watkins

PHYS 342 Wave Phenomena (1)

A study of the mathematical theory of vibrations and waves as illustrated by mechanical and electromagnetic oscillations. Topics include: simple harmonic motion, forced vibrations and resonance, couple oscillators, wave equation for continuous systems, normal modes, and the superposition, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction and polarization of waves. Mathematical techniques such complex analysis and Fourier analysis will be discussed. Laboratory.

  • Prerequisite: PHYS 222
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Beilby, Watkins

PHYS 345 Electromagnetism (1)

A study of electromagnetism using vector calculus. Topics include static electric and magnetic fields in vacuum and matter, electrodynamics, Maxwell's equations, and electromagnetic waves. Mathematical techniques using vector calculus, and other techniques such as solving boundary value partial differential equations will be discussed.

  • Prerequisite: PHYS 222 and MATH 249
  • Offering: Alternate falls
  • Instructor: Altman, Kleinert, Watkins

PHYS 396W Advanced Techniques in Experimental Physics (1)

This course focuses on the methods of conducting research in experimental physics. Important research skills covered are literature searches, experiment design and theory, laboratory techniques, and communication of research through oral presentations and written material. The integration of basic physics concepts learned in pervious courses is emphasized. The first part of the course focuses on electronics, computer data acquisition, use of advanced equipment and data analysis. The second part of the course focuses on completing several advanced experiments, which are related to current research in the department. The final part of the course focuses on the proposing and designing an independent project. A laboratory (PHYS 396Y) is associated with this course. Note that this course will typically be taught in two three-hour blocks per week.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Prerequisite: PHYS 223
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Altman, Kleinert

PHYS 453 Quantum Mechanics (1)

A mathematical development of quantum theory. The first part of the course focuses on solving the Schr-dinger equation in one, two and three dimensions. Further topics include the theory of angular momentum, the hydrogen atom, identical particles and quantum statistics, and time-independent perturbation theory.

  • Prerequisite: PHYS 223 and MATH 249
  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Altman, Kleinert, Watkins

PHYS 470 Advanced Topics in Physics (1)

This course focuses on an active research field in physics. The course offering typically alternates between Cosmology in odd years and Optics in even years, but other special topics may be offered on occasion.

  • Prerequisite: PHYS 223
  • Offering: Every fall
  • Instructor: Kleinert, Watkins

PHYS 490 Independent Study (.25 or .5 or 1)

Individual programs of independent study of topics selected in consultation with faculty. This includes, but is not limited to, additional course work or independent research projects.

  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

PHYS 495 Research Seminar (.5)

Required Senior Year Experience for all resident Physics majors. Students design and carry out individual research projects under the mentorship of a departmental faculty member. Weekly meetings include seminars, discussions of research methods, peer teaching, and opportunities to practice scientific communication skills. The course culminates in a progress report that is given as a formal oral presentation.

  • Prerequisite: PHYS 396W
  • Offering: Every fall
  • Instructor: Altman, Kleinert

PHYS 496 Research Seminar II (.5)

Required Senior Year Experience for all resident Physics majors. Students continue individual research projects begun in Fall semester in PHYS 495. The course culminates in a written senior thesis and a formal oral presentation.

  • Prerequisite: PHYS 495
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Altman, Kleinert