Community Service Learning

Recruiter FAQs

  1. What is it?
  2. When?
  3. Where?
  4. How much is the fee and what does it cover?
  5. How do I register?
  6. What should I bring?
  7. What does the fair look like?
  8. What should I expect?
  9. What are the internship qualifications?
  10. What are the community service and service learning qualifications?

1. What is it?

The Internship and Volunteer fair provides a place for various agencies from the community to recruit applicants for either internship or volunteer positions.

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2. When?

September 16, 2013, 2-5pm

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3. Where?

Cat Cavern, 2nd floor of Putnam University Center

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4. How much is the fee and what does it cover?

The non-profit fee is $20 and for-profit is $35. The fee covers two recruiters, and gives you a covered 6-8 ft table, snacks and beverages during the event.

Additional recruiters (after two) are $5 each.

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5. How do I register?

CLICK HERE!

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6. What should I bring?

Information about your organization, copies of the internships or volunteer position description(s), freebies (optional), banners, poster boards, pictures, etc. Anything that describes your organization’s mission and purpose.

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7. What does the fair look like?

The Internship and Volunteer Fair will be held on the second floor of the University Center. Around 26 organizations and companies will each have a recruiting table for internship and volunteer positions. Snacks and beverages will be available for recruiters.

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8. What should I expect?

All Willamette University students are invited to participate in the Internship and Volunteer Fair. Some students may come to seek out one-time or ongoing volunteer opportunities, internships for their majors, or experiential internships.  Others may come just to see what opportunities are available in the Salem area or to network with community organizations and companies. Expect an assortment of browsers, conversationalists, and serious internship-seekers.

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9. What are the internship qualifications?

A for-credit internship generally means a commitment of 10–12 hours per week. Assignment of tasks and responsibilities typically include some routine work assignments, but should also provide ample opportunities for student interns to engage in creative analysis and critical thinking. Ideally, the internship experiences will include preparation of a research or project report, and a number of smaller reports, journals, meetings, and readings.

All for–credit internships are supervised and evaluated by on–campus and off–campus supervisors and must be approved by the Associated Dean/Director of Career Services. Not–for–credit internships do not have university oversight or required learning contracts. However, we recommend talking with Career Services about any internship which you want to offer. Essentially, all for-profit companies hiring interns without pay must require students to get academic credit in order to comply with federal labor laws.

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10. What are the community service and service learning qualifications?

The Office of Community Service Learning at Willamette University promotes and facilitates partnerships with the community through service. The Office of Community Service Learning houses both the co-curricular Community Outreach Program as well as the academic Service-Learning Program. The opportunities and resources that we offer operate on the premise that university-community collaboration is mutually beneficial and adheres to Willamette University's motto "Not unto ourselves alone are we born."

Willamette defines service to the community in two ways:

  1. Community Service offers Willamette students the opportunity to participate in activities ranging from one–time “episodic” projects to a regular weekly commitment. Volunteer duties can vary from clerical support to one–on–one mentoring with a local elementary student. While this kind of service most often impacts one’s personal development, it is not connected to any kind of coursework or academic credit. However, we do encourage our community partners to assist students in learning from and making meaning of their community service experiences.

  2. Service-Learning, when incorporated into a specific course, encourages Willamette students to apply material learned in the classroom to the local Salem–Portland area organizations, while meeting community needs and addressing social justice issues. This kind of experience, while also impacting one’s personal development, can directly affect their professional development and educational experience at WU. The credit received for the course, along with a letter grade, evaluates the student’ overall performance in the course, including the service-learning component. We encourage our community partners to assist students in learning from and making meaning of their community service experiences as they strive to reach the learning objectives specific to the course.

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