Campus Safety

February 2014 - New Policy

Locking of Some Exterior Doors on Academic and Administrative Buildings.  

DOOR MAP (exterior academic and administrative building doors that are electronically unlocked)

Why was that change made?

  1. The door I use to enter my classroom building is now locked. Why is that?
  2. How does keeping these doors locked improve safety. It just seems annoying.
  3. Is there a lot a crime going on on campus that you are not telling us about? Is this why we have to have this new locking system?
  4. Will all buildings be fully secured with electronic locks?
  5. Is there any plan to add more electronic locks to doors that are desirable to be used as entrances, but are now manually locked?
  6. I would really like to see locks added to [my favorite building]. Will there be any opportunity to provide input into where locks are added and what the priority should be?

1. The door I use to enter my classroom building is now locked. Why is that?

This is being done to improve the security of buildings in the event that a lockdown is required.  Doors that are electronically controlled with continue to be unlocked during the day, but those that have to be manually unlocked will remain locked at all times.

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2. How does keeping these doors locked improve safety. It just seems annoying.

Electronically controlled doors can be remotely locked using door access software.  A command can be sent to all campus doors and they will quickly lock.  Any door that was unlocked with a key requires an employee to go from door to door to lock them.  This not only takes time, it requires that the employee would receive the message to begin the locking process in a timely manner.  This cannot be assured, so keeping these doors locked is a safer method.

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3. Is there a lot a crime going on on campus that you are not telling us about? Is this why we have to have this new locking system?

No.  Crime on campus is very similar to what it has been in previous years, with the exception of the groping incidents that took place in December and off-campus in January. This new locking procedure is a low cost, easily implemented way to add a new layer of security for campus, if there was an emergency where we wanted to be able to securely shelter people in buildings.  The electronic locks allow this to be done remotely and quickly.

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4. Will all buildings be fully secured with electronic locks?

Most buildings will be fully secured with this new procedure.  There are, however, a few buildings that have several doors, many hours of usage and are open to the public.  The University Center is an example.  We will make immediate progress towards the goal of having fewer manually unlocked exterior doors; however, it will be necessary to install additional electronic locks on some buildings to be able to fully implement the desired locking scenario.

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5. Is there any plan to add more electronic locks to doors that are desirable to be used as entrances, but are now manually locked?

Yes, beginning this summer, additional card access doors will be added to some buildings.  More doors will be added in subsequent years.  The high cost of adding this electronic locks does not allow them to be added in all locations, and the high priority locations cannot be added all at one time.  Additional locks will be phased in as funding becomes available.

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6. I would really like to see locks added to [my favorite building]. Will there be any opportunity to provide input into where locks are added and what the priority should be?

Yes, we value your input.  You can e-mail safety@willamette.edu and express your opinion, or contact your student government, or the Classified Council.  If you feel that there are safety issues that are involved with any of your observations, you can also contact the University’s Safety Committee at safety-comm@willamette.edu

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