Scheduling, Events and Conferences

Top 10 Oregon Destinations

Things to see and do while in the State of Oregon.

  1. Timberline Lodge on Mount Hood
  2. McMenamins’ Edgefield
  3. Mail Boats on the Rogue River
  4. High Dessert Museum
  5. Powell’s City of Books
  6. Crater Lake
  7. Terwilliger Hot Springs in the Cougar Recreation Area
  8. Portland’s Chinese Garden
  9. Columbia River Gorge
  10. Hwy 101 Coast Run - Astoria to Brookings, Oregon
  11. Worth Learning More…

1. Timberline Lodge on Mount Hood

Declared a National Historic Landmark in 1977, Timberline Lodge is one of Oregon’s most popular tourist attractions, drawing nearly two million visitors every year. Considered an architectural wonder, it’s still being used for its original intent—a magnificent ski lodge and mountain retreat for all to enjoy.Ground was broken on June 14, 1936. Government camp became the base for a small army of unemployed craftspeople hired by the Federal Works Progress Administration. Timberline Lodge is a tribute to their skills and a monument to a government that responded to the needs of its people in a desperate time. Work was done amazingly quick, rushed due to extreme weather conditions and the uncertainty of the WPA’s future. Just 15 months had passed, when President Franklin Roosevelt dedicated the completed lodge on September 28, 1937.

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2. McMenamins’ Edgefield

Historic Edgefield, built in 1911 as the county poor farm, is a destination resort in the Pacific Northwest that blends Oregon's natural beauty with McMenamins' signature whimsy: original buildings carefully restored with cozy interiors, gardens grown using organic methods, great food and drink, live entertainment and more.Encompassing a 74-acre parcel of farmland at the mouth of the spectacular Columbia River Gorge Scenic Area, the 100 European-style guestrooms and hostel accommodations of Edgefield are a 20-minute drive to or from the center of downtown Portland and about 15 minutes from Portland International Airport.

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3. Mail Boats on the Rogue River

Located on the Southern Oregon coastline, 45 minutes north of the California border on Highway #101 you’ll find Jerry’s Rogue Jets (established in 1958)operating guided boat tours on the Rogue River. Expect a rousing adventure with spectacular scenery following the routes used since 1895 by US Mail boats delivering mail to remote Oregon communities.

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4. High Dessert Museum

Mission of the High Desert Museum: Through exhibits, wildlife, and living history, the High Desert Museum creates learning experiences to help audiences discover their connection to the past, their role in the present, and their responsibility to the future.

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5. Powell’s City of Books

From humble storefront beginnings in 1971 on a derelict corner of northwest Portland, Oregon, Powell's Books has grown into one of the world's great bookstores, with seven locations in the Portland metropolitan area, and one of the book world's most successful dot-coms (www.powells.com), serving customers worldwide. Michael and Walter Powell created a bookstore with a unique recipe that, though viewed as unorthodox, worked: Used and new, hardcover and paperback, all on the same shelf, open 365 days a year and staffed by knowledgeable and dedicated book lovers.

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6. Crater Lake

Like No Place Else on Earth, Crater Lake has inspired people for hundreds of years. No place else on earth combines a deep, pure lake, so blue in color; sheer surrounding cliffs, almost two thousand feet high; two picturesque islands; and a violent volcanic past. It is a place of immeasurable beauty, and an outstanding outdoor laboratory and classroom.

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7. Terwilliger Hot Springs in the Cougar Recreation Area

Terwilliger Hot Springs is open year round for day use from sun up to sunset. Visitors take the 1/4 mile trail to the hot springs, through primeval woodland to find the invigorating scene of the lagoon with the gorgeous Rider Creek waterfall spilling into it. There are six soaking pools spaced apart by rock walls laid out in steps down a ravine. The water comes out of a spectacular rock formation and water temperature of the pools ranges from 105 to 116 degrees. Clothing is optional at the hot springs.

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8. Portland’s Chinese Garden

The Lan Su Chinese Garden began as a dream in the early 1980’s. It became more focused when Portland and Suzhou, China, became sister cities in 1988 and the idea of a building a Suzhou-style garden in Portland became a goal. The majority of the materials used in the construction of the Garden originated in China. Approximately 65 workmen from Suzhou created the structures and completed the work. The majority of the plants in the Garden are indigenous to China; however, they were grown in the United States. Current import bans prevent plants from being brought directly from China. Prior to these recent bans, plants were brought from China to the U.S. and their offspring are what you will see today. Some plants are more than 100 years old and were transplanted from gardens and nurseries in Oregon.

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9. Columbia River Gorge

The Columbia River Gorge is a spectacular river canyon cutting the only sea-level route through the Cascade Mountain Range. The Gorge is 80 miles long and up to 4,000 feet deep with the north canyon walls in Washington State and the south canyon walls in Oregon State. The Columbia River is the second largest river in North America, starting in northern Idaho and southeastern British Columbia, and traveling over 1,200 miles to the ocean. The Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, a year-round recreational area offering the best of outdoor activities including camping, hiking, biking, golf, whitewater rafting and kayaking, windsurfing and kiteboarding, boating, bird watching, photography,  downhill and cross country skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing – the list is endless. Indoor options are also readily available with world-class museums, wine tasting, superb dining opportunities, shopping and spa services. 

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10. Hwy 101 Coast Run - Astoria to Brookings, Oregon

Highway 101 winds down the entire Oregon Coast, 363 miles of coastline from the Columbia River to the California border. The coast is divided into three regions north coast, central coast, and southern coast and each is beloved for different reasons. The state parks along the Oregon Coast were among the first to be developed in the Oregon State Park system. The foresight of the Oregon legislature in securing so many wonderful locations along the coast has guaranteed access to the beach for campers and day users for future generations.

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11. Worth Learning More…

Portland’s UndergroundShanghai Tunnels   These are educational tours of the infamous "Portland Underground" that focuses on the shanghai trade in the City of Portland that survived from 1850-1941, as well as "white slavery", prohibition, and even the turn-of-the-century history of the Industrial Workers of the World (I.W.W.) labor movement in the Northwest. In addition, the early history of the Chinese is covered, along with the Japanese and the Gypsies. These tours are operated by the Cascade Geographic Society (CGS) and provide a unique glimpse back into the hidden (or buried) past of the "City of Roses".

Camp 18, Restaurant and Logging Museum are owned and operated by Gordon and Roberta Smith who adopted the Oregon tradition of numbered logging camps by naming their enterprise “Camp 18” - nostalgia serving as directions as it is located at mile post 18 on Highway 26. Camp 18 began in the early ‘70s with a few rusty pieces of donated old equipment, and has expanded with loans from collectors and the careful purchases of tools and artifacts.  Smith’s collection is now an impressive museum covering the history of logging in the Pacific Northwest. The restaurant is a massive log cabin made entirely with lumber logged by Smith and hauled to the location. Each piece was hand peeled and draw knifed by Smith with the help of his family and friends. One of the most impressive pieces is the huge 85 foot ridge pole in the main room, the largest such structural member known in the United States. It weighed approximately 25 tons when cut and has 5,600 board feet of lumber in it. The rustic building further celebrates native materials with over 50 tons of local rock used for the dinning hall’s two fireplaces.

Cowboy Dinner Tree - Oregon ranchers from Paisley, Summer Lake and Silver Lake once pushed their cattle through Sycan trail to the lush meadows of the Sycan Marsh. The Cowboy Dinner Tree was the half way point where the chuck wagon set up the fire pit to feed the hungry cowhands. Today the Cowboy Dinner Tree is a rustic restaurant, with a few cabins for overnight guests. Wild west flavor without modern amenities like electricity.

For more information visit the Travel Oregon or call 1 800-547-7842 http://www.traveloregon.com/

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