New York Times Reporter and Author to Visit Willamette

On Nov. 2, 2010, David Rohde will tell the compelling story of his capture, detention and escape from tribal areas of Afghanistan. Rohde is a two-time Pulitzer prize winning reporter for The New York Times who has covered the conflicts in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Israel-Palestine, and the Balkans. He is the author of "Endgame: The Betrayal and Fall of Srebrenica, Europe's Worst Massacre Since World War II" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux 1997).

David is currently on leave from his job as an investigative reporter at The New York Times to write a book about Afghanistan and Pakistan since 2001. Previously, Mr. Rohde was the newspaper's South Asia Bureau Co-Chief in New Delhi from 2002 to 2005.  He joined The Times in 1996 and worked as a reporter on the metropolitan desk for five years.

Previously, Mr. Rohde was the Eastern Europe Correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor from 1994 to 1996, a suburban correspondent for The Philadelphia Inquirer from 1992 to 1993, and a Production Associate at ABC News in 1992. Foreign Affairs, The Associated Press and The Washington Report on Middle East Affairs have also published his work.

In 2009, Mr. Rohde was part of an eight-reporter team from The New York Times that won the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for coverage of Afghanistan and Pakistan. In 2001, he received a Silurian Society award for an investigative series he co-wrote on the low quality of New York City court-appointed lawyers.

In 1996, his stories for The Christian Science Monitor on the mass execution of 7,000 Bosnian Muslims following the fall of Srebrenica were awarded the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting, George Polk, Livingston, Sigma Delta Chi, Overseas Press Club, and Investigative Reporters and Editors awards.

In spring 2005, Mr. Rohde was a fellow at Shorenstein Center on Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. In 2000, the Open Society Institute awarded Mr. Rohde a fellowship to write about ethnic and sectarian conflict in various countries.

Born on August 7, 1967, Mr. Rohde grew up in New England and is a graduate of Fryeburg Academy in Fryeburg, Maine and Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. He and his wife, Kristen Mulvihill, live in New York City.

David Rohde