News

Lectures Coincide with Egyptian Exhibition

In conjunction with its forthcoming Egyptian exhibition, In the Fullness of Time: Masterpieces of Egyptian Art from American Collections, the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University has planned a major fall lecture series. Some of the foremost Egyptologists from throughout the United States will lecture on various topics related to the exhibition.

On Friday, Aug. 30, Dr. James Romano, curator of Egyptian, classical, and ancient Middle Eastern art at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, will present an illustrated slide lecture on the social, philosophical, and religious basis of ancient Egyptian art, with an
emphasis on the objects in the exhibition.

On Thursday, Sept. 5, Dr. Kent Weeks, professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo, will deliver the 2002 Hogue-Sponenburgh Lecture on the future of the Valley of the Kings and his discovery of KV5, the family tomb of Ramesses the Great, considered one of the most significant archaeological discoveries in Egypt in the 20th century.

On Thursday, Sept. 12, Dr. Lanny Bell, professor emeritus of Egyptology at the University of Chicago, will give a slide lecture on ancient Egyptian architecture, with an
emphasis on the social, political, and religious purposes of Egyptian temples and tombs.

On Thursday, Sept. 19, Dr. Cathleen Keller, associate professor of Egyptology at the University of California, Berkeley, will present a slide lecture on Egyptian painting
and wall relief, with an emphasis on the relationship between religious beliefs, writing, and the visual arts.

On Thursday, Sept. 26, Dr. Rita Freed, curator of Egyptian, Nubian, and Near Eastern Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, will present a slide lecture on Egyptian sculpture, including the range of subjects explored by the Egyptian sculptor and the social, political, and religious purposes of Egyptian sculpture in the round.

On Thursday, Oct. 10, William Peck, curator of ancient art at the Detroit Institute of Arts, will give a slide lecture on the Egyptian personal arts, including ceramics, furniture, jewelry, clothing, metalwork, and wood, with an emphasis on their role in ancient Egyptian daily life.

On Thursday, Oct. 17, Dr. Diana Craig Patch, research associate of Egyptian art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will give a slide lecture on the history of American Egyptology during the 19th and 20th centuries, with an emphasis on a handful of American scholars who would have a profound impact on the field.

The Romano and Weeks lectures will begin at 5 p.m., all others begin at 7:30 p.m. The Weeks lecture is in Cone Chapel in Waller Hall, all others are in the Paulus Lecture Hall in Willamette University's College of Law. Admission is free.

The lecture series is supported by a major grant from the Oregon Council for the Humanities, with additional support provided by the Salem Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America and an anonymous donor.

The Hogue-Sponenburgh Lecture Fund supports the Weeks lecture, with additional support provided by the Hallie Ford Museum of Art and the Salem Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America.

In the Fullness of Time: Masterpieces of Egyptian Art from American Collections opens August 31 and continues through January 4, 2003. The exhibition presents a survey of Egyptian art and culture from 4500 BC to the end of the Roman period and features 48 objects on loan from some of the most distinguished Egyptian collections in the United
States, including the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. One of the underlying purposes of the exhibition is to introduce audiences in the West to important and rarely seen masterpieces of Egyptian art, including superb examples of painting, relief, sculpture, and the personal arts.

The Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University is located at 700 State Street (corner of State and Cottage Streets) in downtown Salem. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The galleries are closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is $3 for adults and $2 for seniors and students. Children under 12 are admitted free. Admission is free each Tuesday.

For further information, please call 503/370-6855.

[ return to Art of Egypt exhibit ]

08-14-2002