News

Speaker to Discuss Genetically Modified Foods and Food Labeling

Neil E. Harl, the Charles F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor in Agriculture and a professor of economics at Iowa State University, will present the John C. Paulus Lecture "Biotechnology: Global Economic Issues--Genetically Modified Crops and Food Labeling" Monday, April 14, at 5 p.m. at the Collins Legal Center, Room 201, Willamette University College of Law.

Co-sponsored by the Estate Planning and Administration Law Sections of the Oregon State Bar and Oregon State University College of Agriculture, the lecture is free and open to the public.

Harl, a member of the Iowa Bar, is also director of the Center for International Agricultural Finance, which conducts training principally for professionals from Central and Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union and China.

Harl has served as president of the American Agricultural Economics Association and president of the American Agricultural Economics Foundation. He has been named a Fellow of the American Agricultural Economics Association and was an organizer and first president of the American Agricultural Law Association. He has received more than 30 major awards for his distinguished work.

Harl served for seven years by congressional appointment in the Office of Technology Assessment, Technical Assistance Advisory Committee, and chaired that group in 1993-94. From 1981-86, he served on the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges Biotechnology Committee; from 2000-03 he served on the National Advisory Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology and this year is a member of the National Payment Limitation Commission.

He has published 27 books including the 15-volume treatise, "Agricultural Law, Agricultural Law Manual"; 15 editions of "Farm Estate and Business Planning, The Law of the Land and Principles of Agricultural Law" and co-authored more than 350 professional articles and bulletins and more than 850 articles in farm and financial publications.

For further information, call 503-370-6877.

03-26-2003