Lecture Capture Guidelines & Policies

More detailed information can be found here:

  • Lecture Capture for Faculty
  • Lecture Capture for Students
  • Tips for Teaching with Lecture Capture
  • Resources
  • References/For Further Research

Lecture capture provides a means to record lectures, either in full or in part. The Tegrity lecture capture service records audio, presentation slides (any material displayed on your computer screen/data projector) and other class content (such as a document camera). You can also capture live video through a webcam or other digital camera.  Lecture capture offers an opportunity for you to deliver course content in new ways and to make content available for students after class. However, it also places a responsibility on both recorders and viewers to make responsible decisions about the use of recorded materials.

These guidelines answer common questions, offer tips and strategies for best practices, and provide links to University policies and considerations about privacy and property issues that can arise with lecture capture.

General FAQs about Lecture Capture at Willamette

  1. What is lecture capture?
  2. What tool is used for lecture capture at Willamette?
  3. How can lecture capture benefit students?
  4. How do students use lecture capture?
  5. How can lecture capture benefit faculty?
  6. How do faculty use lecture capture?
  7. What student privacy considerations are associated with lecture capture?
  8. Are there copyright issues associated with lecture capture?
  9. Can viewers duplicate or redistribute recorded lectures?
  10. Where are recorded files stored?
  11. Is the Tegrity storage cloud safe?

1. What is lecture capture?

Just what it sounds like - a way to capture or record lectures, either full or in part. Lectures can be pre-recorded and distributed to students ahead of time or they can be captured during a live class session and made available for later review.

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2. What tool is used for lecture capture at Willamette?

Tegrity is the supported lecture capture tool. For specific tips on how to record with Tegrity, go to TEG-RECORD-LINK. For tips on viewing recordings, go to TEG-VIEW-LINK.

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3. How can lecture capture benefit students?

Having a recorded lecture allows students to review material at their own pace for better understanding. Recordings provide additional resources that complement, not replace, the classroom experience by giving students opportunities to review demonstrations, previous lectures and guest speakers. Lecture capture can be utilized to "flip the classroom:" pre-recorded lectures replace traditional homework assignments, freeing class time for increased hands-on work, student-instructor and student-student collaboration and other more interactive problem solving processes.

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4. How do students use lecture capture?

Lecture capture works best as a supplement to traditional classroom practices, not as a replacement. Students generally use recordings to complete homework and review for exams and tests. Recorded lectures can be especially useful in courses such as chemistry, physics or mathematics where large amounts of detailed information are presented in class lectures, relieving students of the need to capture every word in their notebooks and freeing them to interact with the material as it is presented. Students can annotate recordings while viewing them to provide additional study aids.

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5. How can lecture capture benefit faculty?

Lecture once, use the lecture multiple times. Capture special events such as guest lecturers. Resource for students who miss class. Record mini-lectures of supplemental or explanatory content for difficult concepts. Use student notations to identify common points of confusion or questions.

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6. How do faculty use lecture capture?

Each situation is unique. However, the usual approach is to use the lecture capture system to record PowerPoint slides or any other content displayed on the instructor's computer and the lecture audio. Instructors can add annotations and notes to a recording after it has been completed to provide more guidance to students as they review their notes and prepare for exams. Lectures can be recorded outside the classroom and assign viewing as homework, using the class time that is freed up to work through problems and examples and provide additional troubleshooting for difficult questions.

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7. What student privacy considerations are associated with lecture capture?

The same privacy considerations that would apply in a physical classroom, particularly to student work, apply to a lecture capture recording. Tegrity is primarily intended to provide access to material to students who have registered for a specific course for a specific period of time, which is one reason that Tegrity lectures are associated with WISE course sites. If Tegrity is used to disseminate student presentations, group discussions or seminar classes beyond a defined course, faculty members will be responsible for obtaining student consent.  CLICK HERE FOR CONSENT FORM. Faculty members are not required to obtain student consent when broadcasting their own image and content, when no student participation is recorded or when incidental student participation is recorded and the broadcast is directed to a defined course.

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8. Are there copyright issues associated with lecture capture?

Faculty, staff and students are responsible for observing copyright law, including educational fair use guidelines; for obtaining appropriate permission from copyright holders; and for following University policies when incorporating third party content into a Tegrity recording.  Captured lectures that contain short excerpts from a third party may be eligible for dissemination without permission subject to educational fair use guidelines. For more detail, please see the UNIVERSITY's COPYRIGHT POLICY.

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9. Can viewers duplicate or redistribute recorded lectures?

No. In all cases, duplication or redistribution of lectures is prohibited without the express written permission of the course instructor. Unauthorized duplication or dissemination of lecture capture materials may violate federal or state law and University policy. Violation of University policy may result in disciplinary action.

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10. Where are recorded files stored?

Lectures recorded through Tegrity are stored on Tegrity's servers. Lectures can be downloaded in multiple formats at the discretion of the instructor. Instructors and students access recordings by connecting to the Tegrity server through a WISE course site. Once connected to the Tegrity server, you have access to all courses that you are assigned to or registered for. Individual recordings can be made public by generating a unique URL and setting permissions to allow anonymous viewing.

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11. Is the Tegrity storage cloud safe?

Recorded lectures are stored on Tegrity's secure servers. The default permission settings limit access to captured content to the set of individuals who have access to the associated course site in WISE. Extended access to recordings can only be granted by the owner of those recordings.

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