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SSRD 2022 Schedule

Room 1 Schedule: HFMA 215

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  • 9:00 a.m. | DELANEY BUCHANAN | The Language of Lines: A Catalogue and Exploration of Decorative Techniques on Cypriote Objects in the Neumann Collection of the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, from the Early Cypriote to Cypro-Archaic Periods

    During the Bronze Age and the first six centuries of the Iron Age, Cypriote ceramics were characterized by a prominent lack of pictorial representation, which remains a great mystery to art historians today given that such images did appear later. This thesis catalogues and examines decorative techniques visible on the Cypriote objects in the Neumann Collection of the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, which have been dated to the Early Cypriote to Cypro-Archaic periods and various in between, in an effort to better understand this trend in ancient ceramics from Cyprus, the Mediterranean crossroads.

    Faculty Sponsor: Abigail Susik
    Discipline: Art History

  • 9:20 a.m. | DELANEY AGODON | Antonio Canova and Antoine Quatremère de Quincy, 1790-1815: The Impact of Napoleon’s Imperialism on Museums and Neoclassicism

    Napoleon’s plunder of the Vatican Museum led to an almost twenty-five-year debate over the rights of cultural property and the imperialist ideology promoted by the creation of the “national museum.” Two figures credited with the return of the plundered objects were the Italian sculptor Antonio Canova and French theorist Antoine Quatremère de Quincy, who actively condemned the systematic export of art/objects from occupied nations. This presentation will explain the role of Canova and de Quincy in defining cultural heritage, analyzing their early critiques of imperialist institutions. Furthermore, their impact on the contemporary discussion of repatriation will be considered.

    Faculty Sponsor: Abigail Susik
    Discipline: Art History

     

  • 9:40 a.m. | REN DAUBERT | The Mth Dimension: Marcel Duchamp and 19th- and 20th-century Mathematics

    During the 19th-century mathematicians began exploring how visual reality was altered by optical illusions, they discovered non-Euclidean geometry and n-dimensional space, mathematical ideas which altered existing realities. French American artist Marcel Duchamp, influenced by 19th- and 20th-century mathematical discoveries especially those of Henri Poincaré, depicted his interpretation of these concepts in his paintings and readymades. For Duchamp, mathematics was an epistemological tool that provided truth to unexplainable, abstract, and complex paradigms of the world. I will argue the artist challenged traditional conventional aesthetics through his interpretation of modern mathematics and creation of mathematical art.

    Faculty Sponsor: Abigail Susik
    Discipline: Art History
  • 10:00 a.m. | CELESTE GUTENTAG | ‘Queer-Abling’ Darger: Qualifying Henry Darger’s uses of Gender Queering in In the Realms of the Unreal

    Henry Darger led an unremarkable life. Darger's life’s richness came instead from his self-bound novel titled In the Realms of the Unreal. A prognosis of mental deficiency for Henry Darger disqualifies him as a conscious artist and shuts down any discourse of subversion. Darger’s work reveals gender queering through the appropriation of images from popular culture and children's literature. He created figures of feminine childhood imbued with innocence and deviance, queered in both sex and gender. The fantasy space of the text created an acceptable space for deviance not afforded to Darger in his life.

    Faculty Sponsor: Abigail Susik
    Discipline: Art History

  • 10:30 a.m. | ADRIAN SCHNEE | Maya Lin’s Memory Works and the Legacy of the Sixties

    In 1980, a 21-year-old Maya Lin's simple design determined the reconciliation for the Nation's foremost events of the previous three decades. Her initial three ‘Memory Works’ tailored the memorial landscape to recognize not only the corporeal toll of warfare but the burden of bereavement thereafter. In my thesis, I follow the inertia of Lin’s work, originating in the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, continuing into the creation of work dedicated to American Civil Rights, and beyond. I explore her work's interactive nature, both physical and psychological, traced through traditions in monument building and the genealogy of public icons.

    Faculty Sponsor: Abigail Susik
    Discipline: Art History

  • 10:50 a.m. | EXENE VANDENBERG | Takashi Murakami: The Depths of Nonsense in Contemporary Art 1993-Present

    I am exploring the Superflat movement, a Japanese genre within Contemporary art coined by Takashi Murakami. Looking at the history of erotic Japanese art will illuminate the specific categories that pertain to Japanese art history and how it differs from western art. The objective of this project is to challenge the institutional ideas of fine art versus craft. I will be exploring consumerism as it relates to artists as brands and scale of production. The question of alienation, seriality, and labor value will be investigated through a Marxist lens. I argue Murakami delicately balances being an artist with his marketing genius.

    Faculty Sponsor: Abigail Susik
    Discipline: Art History

  • 11:10 a.m. | JOANNA GOLD | Life in Layers: Time and Temporality in the Works of Hung Liu

    The artworks of Hung Liu are a multi-layered exploration into the nature of personhood, gender, time, and memory. This thesis discusses paintings that she created from 1988 to 2008. The chosen works were based on early 20th-century photographs she found in archives in China. Although the identities of the photographed subjects are now lost, Liu combined ancient Chinese artistic motifs with a contemporary perspective in order to join the subjects in a fluid conversation across time. Through iconographical analysis, I examine how the usage of symbols in her paintings establishes this ‘inter-temporal’ dialogue.

    Faculty Sponsor: Abigail Susik
    Discipline: Art History

  • 11:30 a.m. | MADISON MUNRO | Witches Revolt: Goya’s Radical Depiction of Women in Los Caprichos

    Los Caprichos is a series of etchings that uses the supernatural to satirically critique Spanish society. This thesis examines Goya’s iconography of witches in his depictions of women. Goya also depicted women in order to highlight the deficiencies of men. Examining specific Caprichos wherein Goya renders female witches in a multitude of ways, I interrogate whether Goya’s representations of women as witches are a byproduct of sexism, or if instead they are radically revolutionary.

    Faculty Sponsor: Abigail Susik
    Discipline: Art History

  • 2:00 p.m. | EVA MORATH | Virtual Restoration & Perception: Opening Doors to Non-Invasive Restoration Practices

    A common dilemma in the field of art conservation is that of decision making based on professional experience rather than subjective perception, and who should get to make decisions about collective cultural heritage. During a summer internship in Amsterdam at the RCE, ten different virtual restorations of a damaged photograph were presented to two test groups made up of conservation professionals and the general public. The participants were surveyed on their preferences in relation to the images. Through this process, this project aimed to explore the ways in which subjective perception can influence professional decision making in the field of art conservation.

    Faculty Sponsor: Ricardo de Mambro Santos
    Discipline: Art History

  • 2:40 p.m. | ELISA PANELLI | Forgotten Treasures: A Study on Corinthian Pottery from the Hallie Ford Museum of Art

    In this presentation, I will give an overview of my senior thesis research project that focuses on six unpublished examples of ancient Corinthian pottery from the Hallie Ford Museum of Art’s collection. This talk will include a brief summary of the key sources used in my research as well as a quick overview of the history of ancient Corinth and its pottery types. I will then provide an in-depth analysis of a few examples from my project, which will showcase the methods that I used in order to uncover relative dates, functions, and provide historical context for each piece.

    Faculty Sponsor: Ann M. Nicgorski
    Discipline: Archaeology

  • 3:10 p.m. | EMMA CANCHOLA | A Study of Ancient Egyptian Frog Lamps From the Fred W. Neumann Collection

    In this study, I will present an overview of my senior thesis research on the eleven unpublished frog lamps from the Fred W. Neumann collection at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. This type of lamp seems to have been produced exclusively in Egypt around the third century CE to about the seventh century CE. I will focus on specific examples from the collection to discuss the production and evolution of these lamps, the use of frogs in Egyptian culture and mythology, and how their iconography was used to symbolize ideas such as creation, fertility, and rebirth.

    Faculty Sponsor: Ann M. Nicgorski
    Discipline: Archaeology

  • 3:30 p.m. | ROWAN BARTON | Money Talks: Severan Dynasty Coins in the Hallie Ford Museum of Art

    In this talk, I will discuss the spatiotemporal significance of the 43 Roman coins from the Severan dynasty (193-235 C.E.) in the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. First, I will explore how coins can be studied by collecting qualitative and quantitative data. Then, I will explain how I used this data, along with modern and ancient scholarship, to better understand how coin iconography, inscriptions, and material composition differ across time and space. Finally, I will focus in on a few specific coins of interest that this methodology helped to reveal new information about.

    Faculty Sponsor: Ann M. Nicgorski
    Discipline: Archaeology

  • 3:50 p.m. | ISAAC VIZAS | Red Slip and Red Men: The Ritual and Religious Connotations of Israelite and Judean Red Ware in Light of Genesis 2

    In this talk, I will present my senior thesis topic, the relationship between the Genesis 2 creation story and the archaeological record. Specifically, I will explore a possible link between Genesis’s Red Man, and the distinctive terracotta red ware of late Iron I to Iron IIA Israel (ca. 1200-850 BCE). Using both pre-exilic (before 600 BCE) literary sources, such as Amos and Job, excavated pottery and other cultic materials,. I propose that Adam himself may have been a semi-divinized red clay terracotta vessel.

    Faculty Sponsor: Ann M. Nicgorski
    Discipline: Archaeology

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