Summer Classes

Get a head start on college!

Graduating from high school this spring? Jump-start your college education by enrolling in one or more of Willamette’s summer classes. Designed with our first-year college students in mind, these classes will introduce you to a range of academic departments, as well as to your future Willamette professors and classmates.

Classes will be taught remotely, utilizing a mixture of video discussion, streamed lecture and video content, and student-centered, interactive work. All courses will be capped at no more than 16 students.

FAQs

When are classes offered?

All classes will be offered from Monday, July 6 through Thursday, July 30, 2020. Classes meet four days per week, Monday through Thursday.

What credit will I earn?

Most classes are .5 credits, with a couple of 1-credit offerings. This can be applied towards your Willamette graduation requirement of 31 overall credits. If you choose to attend a different college in the fall, we’ll be sorry to see you go — but you may transfer this credit to another school (it will transfer as two semester-hours at schools on the semester system).

What does it cost?

The cost is $1,000 per .5 credit course, or $2,000 for a 1-credit course. If you enroll at Willamette in the fall, 50% of what you have paid will be applied as a credit to your fall term bill.

Because our special summer tuition is a fraction of ordinary tuition, no financial aid will be available for these classes.

What technology and books will I need?

Students will need access to a computer and high-speed internet connection. A subscription to necessary videoconferencing software is included in the cost of tuition, and all readings and films will be made available free of charge online.

Courses

One-credit options:

ENVS 120: Social Systems and the Environment

This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to understanding the effects of human actions and social systems on the natural world. We will emphasize science and social science-based approaches to understanding environmental problems and evaluating possible solutions to them. We will begin by examining basic concepts regarding social and natural systems. These concepts will then be applied as we evaluate and understand issues of environmental quality and stresses on natural resources. Throughout the course we will pay close attention to how human social, political, economic, and ethical institutions influence our interactions with natural systems. This course is intended to introduce Environmental Science majors and prospective majors to the social science aspects of environmental science as well as educate students from other disciplines.

Days/Times: M, T, W, Th: 12:00–2:45 p.m.
Credits: 1.0
Faculty: Joe Bowersox and Karen Arabas
Department: Environmental Science

The following two classes may be taken separately, but have been designed to complement one another:

CHEM 199: Better Living through Chemistry? The Chemistry of Health

Good nutrition, clean water, and effective medicines — we all know these things are essential for building healthy societies and healthy bodies. But how do they actually work, at a chemical level? What makes water safe, or unsafe? How does the body process nutrients? How do chemists formulate drugs? This class may be taken by itself, but is also designed to pair with SOC 199: Who Gets to Live Well? : Health and Social Inequality. The two classes, taken together, will count towards the Public Health: Ethics, Advocacy, and Leadership major and minor.

Days/Times: M, T, W, Th: 1:30–2:45 p.m.
Credits: 0.5
Faculty: Kirk & Fisher
Department: Chemistry

SOC 199: Who Gets to Live Well? Health and Social Inequality

Good nutrition, clean water, and effective medicines — we all know these things are essential for building healthy societies and healthy bodies. But in a world of haves and have-nots, who gets to have access to these essential building blocks? From food deserts in inner cities, to the catastrophic failure of the public water supply in Flint, MI, to uneven access to medical care, this course will explore the sociological implications of community health disparities across American. This class may be taken by itself, but is also designed to pair with CHEM 199: Better Living through Chemistry. The two classes, taken together, will count towards the Public Health: Ethics, Advocacy, and Leadership major and minor.

Days/Times: M, T, W, Th: 3:00–4:15 p.m.
Credits: 0.5
Faculty: Kelley Strawn
Department: Sociology

Half-credit classes:

ANTH 199: Indigenous Cinema

This course introduces students to the dynamic world of global Indigenous film and film-makers. We will view and discuss shorts, documentaries, and feature films made by members of many Indigenous nations in the U.S., Canada, and beyond, with the aim of understanding how these productions assert new visions and voices that go beyond confining stereotypes. We will investigate how, through various forms of Indigenous storytelling, these films represent gender, urban life, language, politics, humor, and ‘nature’. Students will acquire new skills in critical thinking, visual literacy, scholarly research, and effective writing. Activities will include discussion forums, viewing journals, and a mini research project on a topic of the student’s choosing.

Days/Times: M, T, W, Th: 7:00–8:15 p.m.
Credits: 0.5
Faculty: Rebecca Dobkins
Department: Anthropology

CHEM 199: Chemistry Gets It Done: Nanotech to Alternative Fuels

This course will offer a review of introductory chemical concepts through the lens of critical real-world applications, including biomedical research, materials science, engineering, environmental chemistry, and alternative fuels. Topics include dimensional analysis, molecular structure and function, reactions in solution, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and the occasional gratuitous explosion. Intended for students with at least a recent full year of chemistry who want to refresh and expand on their fundamental preparation for more advanced scientific study, while exploring the breadth of applications within chemical science. Students completing this course will be prepared to follow it up with the second semester of our General Chemistry sequence.

Days/Times: M, T, W, Th: 1:30–2:45 p.m.
Credits: 0.5
Faculty: Holman, Williamson and Battle
Department: Chemistry

ENGL 199: Creative Writing: Performance Poetry

From ancient Greece to modern-day poetry slams and Def Poetry Jam, the history of poetry is a history of oral and physical performance. In this class, students will analyze, write, and perform poems in print, acoustical, and video media formats. We will study how authors perform their work, explore how they adapt page-based poems to non-print formats, and use audio and video technologies to do our own adaptations and performances of original poems and poems by others.

This class will have four units. Unit One will focus on the key features of poetry from the perspective of performance. Unit Two will center on oral performance and audio recording. Unit Three will be devoted to staged performance and video recording. And Unit Four will focus on poetry performance as a form of literary tribute. We will read, listen to, view, write about, and discuss poems on a daily basis, and students will develop three projects based around original poems or poems by other people: a rehearsed audio poem or an analysis of an audio poem; a rehearsed video poem or an analysis of a video-based poem; and a video tribute poem or an analysis of a video tribute poem.

This is a class designed for poets and non-poets alike. If you’re a writer looking to expand your horizons, skills, and portfolio, this class is for you. If you’re not a poet but are nevertheless interested in poetry, media effects, literary analysis, or communication technologies, this class is for you as well.

Days/Times: M, T, W, Th: 3:00–4:15 p.m.
Credits: 0.5
Faculty: Mike Chasar
Department: English

IDS 199: Clothing and Memory

This course explores the multiple ways the clothes we wear tell stories about our life’s journey and are embedded with meaning and memory. How do our clothes communicate identity, offer protection, and celebrate the past? How do we read or interpret the performance of ourselves and others by the garments we inhabit? How have the rapid changes in fashion and technology since the 16th century altered our physical bodies and rewritten the narrative of our clothing choices? Through the reading of historical and contemporary fiction, personal narrative, and essays, we will explore and make sense of the meaning and memories created by the clothes hanging on our bodies and in our closets. Our goal will be to focus on how scholarly based inquiry can help us to answer our questions, and how this inquiry can inform current discussions about cultural memory. Projects may include oral history, material culture curation, and the manipulation of garments.

Days/Times: M, T, W, Th: 12:00–1:15 p.m.
Credits: 0.5
Faculty: Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Department: Theatre & Interdisciplinary Studies

MATH 152: Accelerated Calculus II

A second course in Calculus. Topics covered include definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, volume, arc length and surface areas, integration techniques, improper integrals, polar coordinates, and parametric equations. Will cover material dropped from the end of the AB and BC Calculus classes and tests this spring as a result of early school closures.

Days/Times: M, T, W, Th: 12:00–1:15 p.m.
Credits: 0.5
Faculty: Inga Johnson
Department: Math

PSYC 199: Introduction to Psychology and Law

How accurate is eyewitness memory? Why might someone falsely confess to a crime they didn't commit? How might racial or gender biases affect decision-making in the legal system? Under what circumstances might someone not be held responsible for a crime that they committed? These questions fall at the intersection of Psychology and Law. During this course, we will address these four questions of Law by examining the Psychology research that speaks to these issues. Case studies will be utilized to allow us to explore each of these issues given actual legal cases.

Days/Times: M, T, W, Th: 3:00–4:15 p.m.
Credits: 0.5
Faculty: Meredy Goldberg-Edelson
Department: Psychology

IDS 199: Quantitative Problem Solving for Science

This course is designed for students considering a STEM major who want to strengthen their pre-calculus problem-solving skills; it may be of particular interest to students planning on enrolling in Chem 115, Math 150 or Physics 221 in the fall. Topics we’ll cover include: functions and graphing, linear rates, logarithmic and exponential functions, and vectors and trigonometry. In looking at all of these topics we’ll focus on real-world applications and problem-solving.

Days/Times: M, T, W, Th: 12:00–1:15 p.m.
Credits: 0.5
Faculty: Rachel Dewey Thorsett
Department: Interdisciplinary Studies


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