Lū'au Program 2020

  • 5:30 p.m. - Doors Open, Dinner Service Begins
  • 7 p.m. - Show Begins

Note: Doors will close promptly at 7 p.m. No late admittance.


Show Details

luau-program-2019


No Ka Moku Kiakahi Ke Aloha

Women's Kahiko, Taught by Shione Mochizuki

This is a medium-paced women’s dance and the dancers are wearing traditional paʻu skirts, which are characterized by a thick waist band and a flared skirt. Kahiko is a traditional Hawaiian dance to the beat of a drum. This mele captures the seagoing spirit of the Hawaiian people as they challenge natureʻs obstacles to navigate the ocean. It talks about the deck creaking and sea spray splashing against the hull of the beloved one-masted ship. The combination of multiple voices and the beat of the ipu gives it great energy and power.

 

Tika Tonu

Haka (traditional Maori war dance), Taught by Mykah Fujiwara

Composed in 1914 by Waimarama Puhara, a highly respected chief of Aotearoa, this chant was dedicated to his son, Moana, in a time of hardship. Tika Tonu is a chant of struggle, challenge, perseverance, and achievement. It pays homage and respect to those who have guided young people in times of trouble and is often used to inspire young men as they make the difficult transition into adulthood.

 

Kahoʻolawe - Makaha Sons

Themed Dance, Taught by Joelle Patricio & Ysa Willits

This is a contemporary song open to both men and women with prior experience in hula. This mele speaks about the now-deserted island of Kahoʻolawe and the dancers use ʻiliʻili, which are water-worn pebbles. Two ʻiliʻili are held in each hand and the dancer clicks them together to make sounds in time with the mele. The lyrics speak of the proud island of Kahoʻolawe and its abundance of hinahina blossoms. This song was based off of an article describing King Kalākaua’s visit where he climbed a road up the windy mountains, through forests, and past bubbling water springs on his way to meet the chief.

 

Hanohano Hanalei - Na Kaholokula

Women's 'Auana 1 (contemporary Hawaiian dance), Taught by Joelle Patricio

This is a fast-paced, upbeat women’s dance. ʻAuana is a contemporary Hawaiian dance usually accompanied by vocals and a variety of instruments. This mele talks about the glory and beauty of Hanalei Bay on the island of Kauaʻi. The lyrics talk about the the majestics streams of Molokama, early morning mist that lingers over the bay, and sea spray as the waves crash against the breakwall. It highlights the slippery Manuʻakepa seaweed and ever-present heavy rainfall that the residents of Hanalei are accustomed to, which are just a few of the many reasons why Kauaʻi is called the garden isle.

 

ʻUlupalakua - Kapena

Men’s ʻAuana (contemporary Hawaiian dance), Taught by Mykah Fujiwara

This is a fast-paced, contemporary men’s dance. ʻAuana is a contemporary Hawaiian dance usually accompanied by vocals and a variety of instruments. The dancers are wearing palaka bandanas and clothes similar to paniolos, the original Hawaiian cowboys. This mele originates from Maui and speaks about the up-country slopes which were named ʻUlupalakua by an ancient chief for its prosperous breadfruit trees. The lyrics also speak about the beautiful mountains, lush valleys, and overwhelming smell of ginger.

 

Fire Tahitian Beat - No Te Here Ote Hiroa Polynesian Club of Fresno

ʻŌteʻa (traditional Tahitian dance), Taught by Ysa Willits & Shione Mochizuki

This number is a fast-paced ʻŌteʻa full of intricate footwork and isolated hip movements. ʻŌteʻa is a traditional dance from Tahiti distinguished by rapid hip motions accompanied by drum beats. It originated as a dance to charm lovers, challenge enemies, worship gods, and for prayer. It evolved into a ceremonial dance, which is commonly seen today. Although there is no verbal component to the song, the meaning is conveyed through the choreography.

 

Hei Iti Vaihi Moʻi - Hapa

‘Ahuroa (contemporary Tahitian dance), Taught by Ysa Willits

Recalling one’s connection to home and culture, Rori Rori is a song about family ties, personal experiences, love life, and the special bond that is created with the people around you. Each of these things is expressed in our dancers’ movements. It speaks of the tropical aspects of the island and identifying with one’s cultural roots.

 

Fire Knife Dancing

Tolo Tuitlele

"I, Toloumu Tuitele of the Leone Clan, son of Fa'atuiolemotu Maugaula Sagaaau Tuitele, will be dazzling the loyal Willamette University fans with an epic show of fearless talent. I will bring my culture and passion to the stage and share it with all to be a part of my performance. I will wield a blade of fire and tame it with my own soul through circular spinning, jumping, flips, toss-ups and many more moves that I will come up with the day of the event. I will show the world who the "fire whisperer" of this realm really is with screams of my people and drums of my ancestors. I will show the world, that one man with one knife stood amongst the crowd - fearless! I am him. I am Toloumu Tuitele the last of the Leone Clan. Witness when I stand before you...."

T. Tuitele

 

Hanuʻaʻala - Kamaka Kukona

Women's ʻAuana 2 (contemporary Hawaiian dance), Taught by Jordan Hitchcock

This is a slow-paced, graceful women’s dance. ʻAuana is a contemporary Hawaiian dance usually accompanied by vocals and a variety of instruments. This mele was originally written as a blessing for the opening ceremony of a halau. It speaks of the Manoa Valley on the island of Oʻahu, and the beauty that is found in the rainfall, lehua blossoms, and verdant highlands. It compares the rainfall and lehua blossoms in Manoa Valley to the gathering of lovers and the emotions stirring in one's heart.

 

E Hīhīwai - Sons of Hawaii

Couples ʻAuana (contemporary Hawaiian dance), Taught by Joelle Patricio and Ysa Willits

This is a medium-paced song with an upbeat rhythm.  ʻAuana is a contemporary Hawaiian dance usually accompanied by vocals and a variety of instruments. This mele speaks about the isolated valley of Wailau on the north shore of the island of Molokaʻi. The landscape of the valley is described by talking about the steep cliffs, chilly wind, Kahiwa waterfalls, and ʻOlokuʻi mountain. It highlights the hīhīwai that can be found in abundance in its streams, which are freshwater snails and comparable to opihi. The abundance of hīhīwai are compared to the friendliness and love the people have for their heritage and land.

 

Mele Lānaʻi - Larry Endrina

Faculty/Staff ʻAuana (contemporary Hawaiian dance), Taught by Joelle Patricio

This is a medium-paced ʻAuana danced by the faculty and staff members of Willamette University.  ʻAuana is a contemporary Hawaiian dance usually accompanied by vocals and a variety of instruments. This mele is about the importance of the small, but famous island of Lānaʻi. It speaks of the beautiful gold kaunaʻoa flowers and pineapples that bring wealth to its people.

 

Nāʻale O Niʻihau - Brothers Cazimero

Choreographer's Dance, Taught by Joelle Patricio & Ysa Willits

This is a medium-paced song that speaks about the second smallest island of Niʻihau and is comprised of our choreographers. This mele speaks about the generosity of the Niʻihau people and Kahelelani shells that are found on the shore. The love the people have for their island is represented by the Kahelelani shells that play in the waves only to return to the shore and happiness one feels as they gaze upon this forbidden isle.

 

Kaulana ʻo Hilo Hanakahi - Lito Arkangels

Co-ed ‘Auana (contemporary Hawaiian dance), Taught by Jordan Hitchcock

This is a medium-paced song that speaks about the island of Hawaiʻi, nicknamed the Big Island. This mele talks about the beautiful lehua of Panaʻewa on the island of Hawaiʻi. It highlights some of the beautiful sights in Hilo, like the misty clouds and snow that sit upon the summit of Mauna Kea and the rainbows that arch over Waianuenue.