Course Descriptions

CCM 101 Public Speaking (4)

Communicating effectively to a public audience, with an emphasis on speech. Course covers development of arguments, consideration of audience and situation, organization of material, and multimodal presentation including effective use of visual technologies with oral communication.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 102 Argumentation, Advocacy and Debate (4)

The basic structure of argumentation and advocacy are examined with a view toward being able to participate in debate and other public advocacy events. Topics for debate will be chosen from among those being debated in the public sphere. Each student will be required to participate in a minimum of six debates in order to complete the course.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 103 Designing Media (4)

Project based course focused on design of civic media. Provides community service learning opportunities for students interested in working with local organizations to address communication challenges. Considers the reciprocal relationship between media and public culture; examines participatory media technologies and practices; covers stages of project ideation, design, implementation, testing and evaluation.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Koenig Richards, Staff

CCM 104 Communicating Race (4)

This course considers how race (a social construct with real-world implications) affects intrapersonal, interpersonal, and public communication. Communicating Race combines the tools of self-reflection, rhetorical listening, and the analysis of public discourse to answer complex questions, such as—How do people come to understand their own racialized identities? How do people talk about race in ways that both maintain and contest power relations? How do conversations about race challenge and also perpetuate systemic inequalities? Through the process of collaboratively pursuing answers to guiding questions such as these, students are prompted to more fully recognize their own intersectional positionality in relation to institutionalized power. Communicating Race engages with students’ lived experiences, while also exploring a range of theoretical concepts including implicit bias, stereotype threat, white fragility, micro-aggressions, allyship, speaking for others, systemic racism, colorblind racism, and anti-racism. By learning to convey their increasingly nuanced understanding of race through a variety of media, furthermore, students in this course will gain valuable experience communicating about complex topics and enacting how communication can be meaningfully used toward antiracist ends.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: PDE
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Parker Brooks

CCM 199 Topics in Civic Communication and Media (1-4)

A semester-long study of topic in Civic Communication and Media. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and Topics Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

CCM 201 Arguing About the Right Thing to Do (4)

The course investigates methods of arguing about ethics. First, students will be introduced to the general question of whether matters of right and wrong are susceptible to argument. are questions of right and wrong merely personal choices or do argumentative methods exist to distinguish right from wrong? Second, students will be introduced to various methods of arguing about ethical matters. Finally, these methods or argument will be applied to several examples of ethical questions prevalent in civic society, especially those including life and death, personal liberty, personal responsibility, and ethical rhetoric. The course also requires that students make presentations about ethical matters.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Alternating Years
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 202 Designing Persuasive Campaigns (4)

The primary aim of this course is to offer students the opportunity to creatively apply the core principles of rhetoric to a persuasive campaign they develop from start to finish. Students will learn about key rhetorical variables such as audience and context as well as major rhetorical tools ranging from argument to framing. In addition, the role of visual elements in persuasion will be explored. Each student will produce a complete campaign plan that will be presented in class. Student projects can focus on politics, corporate advocacy, and non-profit organization. Opportunities for working with organizations in the Salem community are available.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 220W Analyzing Public Discourse (4)

A writing-centered course focusing on criteria for and approaches to the analysis of public discourse. Critical forms such as the analysis of situation, arguments, structure, style, power and media will be explored through case studies. Provides training in methods of analysis necessary for advanced coursework, including forms and rhetorical criticism..

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 221 Rhetorical Theory (4)

This course approaches rhetorical theory through the concept of a pluriverse that informs contemporary postcolonial and decolonial rhetorical theories. By centering scholars, organizers, activists, and artists whose work is informed by lived experiences as well as by postmodern, postcolonial, decolonial, queer, critical, feminist, and disability studies, this course considers how broader intellectual and cultural movements are shaping the future of rhetorical studies. Moreover, this course equips students to connect the study of rhetoric to ethical ways of thinking and being in the world.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities; PDE
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Parker Brooks

CCM 245 Civic Media (4)

Examines uses of media to foster civic engagement. Through analysis of case studies students consider concepts such as participatory culture, citizen journalism, transmedia activism, and civic, radical and tactical media. We also develop understanding of civic media across platforms (oral, print, broadcast, digital), contexts (local to global, past to present), and use.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Spring semester
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 255 Grief Communication: Listening, Storytelling, and Dialogue (4)

This course engages the topic of grief from personal, cultural, and scholarly vantage points. By reflecting upon personal experiences with grief, facilitating dialogues about grief within the course, and analyzing contemporary public discourse about bereavement, students gain vocabulary, skills, and insight to communicate effectively toward healing and transformation. This course centers the theoretical study and practical application of listening, storytelling, and dialogue, core competencies for students interested in the caring professions. 

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Parker Brooks

CCM 258 Gender and Mass Communication in Asia (4)

This course is an introduction to the study of gender and media cultures, with a focus on the Asian cultural context. It provides an introduction to historical, theoretical, and methodological approaches involved in such study. It aims at encouraging comparative cultural studies through analysis and comparisons of gender in the Asian culture with gender in non-Asian cultures. No prior experience required.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Wen

CCM 260 Communicating Environmental and Climate Justice (4)

Journalists, government officials, corporate and environmental advocacy group representatives, small business owners, and concerned community members, among other actors, generate and respond to different rhetorical materials about “the environment.” However, what this term signifies and the implications for engaging in sustainable practices often are ambiguous, contested, and are entwined with colonialism, racial capitalism, neoliberalism, environmental privilege, and other interrelated systemic problems that disproportionately create negative conditions for Indigenous peoples, people of color, and low-income individuals and communities. This course requires students to examine how particular frameworks and discourses support or pose challenges to US environmental movements, with particular focus on environmental and climate justice. To examine various communication contexts in discussions, readings, writing assignments, community activities, and multi-media production and critique, the course requires students to collaborate with local partners to practice applying course concepts and the university’s commitment to advancing equity and social justice in our communities. This engagement relies on service learning to examine questions, challenges, and possibilities that shape and are shaped by different media environments and experiences.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities; World Engagement: Service Learning
  • Prerequisite: Completion of CCM 101, CCM 102, CCM 103, CCM 201, CCM 202, or IDS 062X
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 261 Media, Technology, and Society (4)

Examines the dynamic media environment, with a focus on digital technologies. Students will investigate the relationship between media, technology, and society, and develop skills for effective, ethical engagement with contemporary media.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Koenig Richards, Pham

CCM 265 Rhetorics of Sex and Gender (4)

This course explores the role of gender performativity in the creation, practice, and criticism of rhetoric. Students will investigate the relationship between sex and gender, analyze the ways that relationship is used as an interpretive lens for popular and political communication, and consider the role of mediation in the rhetorical construction of gender identity.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 288 Introducing Asia to the World (4)

The course introduces students to media production based on the content of East Asian history, society, and people. The societies of East Asia, especially China, Korea, and Japan, have rich, complex, and multifaceted historical and cultural experiences. Yet, media representations focus on certain aspects while ignoring others. The course integrates the acquisition of knowledge and awareness of East Asia with critical thinking and media production. Students will work in project teams to choose a topic that they are interested in, prepare their own presentation and production, and to facilitate in-class discussions. Possible projects might include: design a syllabus to teach Asia to a specific group of people; curate and organize an Asian film screening festival; start a website that is relevant to Asian culture and people; or make a short video about the history of a very specific topic, such as Japanese cuisine.

  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Wen

CCM 299 Topics in Civic Communication and Media (1-4)

A semester-long study of topic in Civic Communication and Media. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and Topics Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

CCM 301 Asian Visual and Creative Culture (4)

From Miyazaki’s animations and Hong Kong’s martial arts movies to Korean popular media, Chinese avant-garde artists’ political voices or ordinary social media uses, visual productions enrich the intellectual and popular culture landscape in Asia. This course offers an introduction to the history, theory, economy, technology, production, consumption, and regulation of visual culture and creative industry in modern Asian society. Students are presented a broad view on Asian visual culture, and an in-depth investigation of visual culture as a necessary component of, and influencer of, Asian society. The course encourages the comparative studies of politics and aesthetics of visual culture in different cultural contexts, and helps students become critical viewers and mindful users of media.

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Wen

CCM 310 Asian Social Media in Global Context: Critique and Design (4)

This course examines Asian social media as a form of digital culture and globalization. With its focus on contemporary forms of Asian social media, students will analyze, evaluate, and critique social media as it is manifest across different cultural contexts, particularly with respect both to institutional power and rhetoric and to individual agency and expression. Students will be challenged to reflect on social media as an emergent, hegemonic form of generating and participating in culture, to understand its risks and benefits to society, as well as to develop their own purposeful ethic regarding social media use and participation.

  • General Education Requirement: Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences; World Engagement: NEL study beyond 132, CV
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Wen

CCM 330 Communicating Peace (4)

This course explores what structural conditions, power dynamics, and communicative processes are necessary to build positive peace—peace marked not just by the absence of war and violence, but the peace that exists among people who respect the fullness of one another’s humanity and among societies wherein that respect is conveyed through systems, policies, power dynamics, and mediated representations. In particular, this course studies ways in which positive peace is constituted communicatively as an ongoing process of recognition, reconciliation, and community building. Students will be equipped to transform intrapersonal, interpersonal, and societal conflicts more aptly through the development of a deeper understanding of the words and symbols that define communities and conflicts. This course then empowers students to become more effective community organizers, activists, and advocates for justice.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities; PDE
  • Prerequisite: CCM 220W or CCM 221
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Parker Brooks

CCM 335W Communicating Self and Society (4)

This course introduces students to autoethnography--a qualitative research method that incorporates lived experience, personal narrative, and cultural analysis. Communicating Self and Society features a diverse range of personal narratives, which engage the intersectional nature of identity while interrogating social injustice and reimagining transformative ways of being together. In Communicating Self and Society, students learn to examine the cultural meanings of their own lived experiences, reflecting upon the intersectional nature of their identity, through the latest research regarding autoethnographic approaches. Further, students learn to communicate their enriched understandings through narrative analysis, peer review, and practice with various forms of mediated self-expression.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities; Writing-centered; PDE
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Parker Brooks

CCM 341 Feminist Media Before 1920 (4)

This course examines rhetorical practices through which advocates of equality cultivated political agency among disenfranchised Americans, developed a powerful movement for social change, and challenged norms that excluded women from the public sphere.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Koenig Richards

CCM 342 Feminist Media Since 1920 (4)

This course examines rhetorical practices through which Americans since 1920 have developed and challenged feminist politics, redefined expectations for gender performance and public leadership, and pursued the promise of "liberty and justice for all" in the United States.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Koenig Richards

CCM 343 Controversies in the Northwest Public Discourse (4)

Project based course in which student identify and analyze communication and media through which residents, activists, organizations and policy makers engage a controversy in the Pacific Northwest. Potential topics include immigration, health care, marriage equality, land use and tribal sovereignty. After conducting and presenting critical analyses of existing public discourse, students will develop, carry out and present projects that aim to improve public participation and discourse related to the selected controversy.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: CCM 220W and CCM 221
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 344 Asian Americans and the Media (4)

CCM 344 approaches Asian Americans and their relationship to the media in a historical and contemporary context. It focuses on the role that mass- and independent media play in domestic and transnational cultural exchange and appropriation, Asian/Asian-American representation, Orientalism, race and sexuality, and political activism. The course will review traditional media outlets such as film, theatre, and television; new media outlets such as YouTube and blogs; and sites for alternative cultural production and expression such as stand-up comedy halls and comics. Analysis will be grounded in theories and methodologies of Rhetoric, Communication Studies, Media Studies, and Asian American Studies and will enrich student understanding of the history of Asian Americans, their historical imaging and imagination of Asian Americans, and Asian American class, sexuality, and culture more generally.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities; PDE
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Pham

CCM 345 Latina/o/x Communication Studies (4)

This course offers foundations for engaging historical and contemporary Latina/o/x-related media. The course examines diverse communication contexts, ranging from the Pacific Northwest to Puerto Rico. Analyzing a variety of vernacular and institutional discourses about, by, and/or for Latina/o/xs, this course approaches popular culture artifacts (e.g., music videos and films), social movement advocacy efforts, and political and legal rhetoric as significant sites for studying borders, citizenship, colonialism/coloniality, community building, exploitation, (im)/migration, intersectional identities, power, racism, representation, resistance, and transgression, among other topics. The course also asks class members to create their own media on topics significant for Latina/o/x communication studies.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities; PDE
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 350 Pop Culture, Power, and Marginality (4)

This course examines the ways various elements of popular culture inform and reflect our attitudes, behavior, and society. As major forces through which various types of information – from politics to economics, from style to sports – are distributed within contemporary culture, popular culture also asserts values and ideology about in approaching issues of our lives. This course is one attempt to understand that role and to provide critical skills and ways of reading popular culture that will encourage each of us to reflect upon, and problematize, the ever-present influence of popular culture on the contours of everyday life. 

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities; PDE
  • Prerequisite: CCM 220W
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Pham

CCM 360 Topics in Public Discourse (4)

Students and faculty examine public discourse regarding special topics of interest or controversy. Topics may include climate change, immigration reform, the definition of marriage, and racial justice movements.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: CCM 220W or CCM 221 or consent of instructor
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 361 Citizenship and the Public Sphere (4)

Many formulations of rhetoric, citizenship and democracy assume the existence of "the public" and theorize the ideal "public sphere." In this course, we will examine scholarship about the public, investigate how civic engagement is shaped by this powerful term, and consider how conceptions of the public sphere can both facilitate deliberative democracy and reinforce inequalities.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: CCM 221, CCM 220W, WGS 245, or WGS 353W
  • Offering: Alternate Years
  • Instructor: Koenig Richards

CCM 363 Persuasive Technologies (4)

The internet and related technologies have reshaped how people communicate, share knowledge, and engage in civic life. This course examines the relationship between technology and persuasion, with a focus on digital communication. Students will consider the implications of persuasive technology in society, education, and in their own lives.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: CCM 221, or CCM 220W
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Koenig Richards, Staff

CCM 364W Political Communication (4)

This course develops a rhetorical framework for understanding campaign communication, the symbolic nature of the presidency and the way groups and the media control political realities. Language is studied as a symbolic means of creating and projecting images and issues.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: CCM 220W
  • Offering: Fall semester
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 366 Ethics of Public Argument (4)

Examines advanced problems involved in theorizing the ethics of argumentation in the public sphere. Prepares students to understand the complexity of these problems, to begin developing informed responses to them, and to adapt such theoretical positions to the analysis and production of public argument. Develops skills introduced in Analyzing Public Discourse and Rhetorical Theory.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: CCM 221
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 367 Networked Social Movements (4)

Investigates relationships between social movements and the media, with particular attention to communication practices that connect, radicalize and empower marginalized community members. Course participants will explore frameworks, methods and concepts--such as pre-inception rhetoric, counterpublicity, movement structure and cycles, tactical media, and oscillation--for understanding networked social movements, past and present.


CCM 394/395 Internship (2-4)

This course is offered to sophomores, juniors and seniors majoring in Civic Communication and Media. The instructor will work with students to help acquire internships in the Salem/Portland area and oversee the internship as it progresses throughout the semester. A variety of internship placements will be pursued including those in the non-profit, political and corporate sectors. Internships will focus on communication activities such as audience research, message development and outreach tactics. Students will be asked to complete short assignments throughout the internship, as well as turn in a final synopsis paper. Interested students should contact the instructor the semester prior to their internship in order to secure a worthwhile position.

  • General Education Requirement: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: By instructor consent only
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 399 Topics in Civic Communication and Media (1-4)

A semester-long study of topic in Civic Communication and Media. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and Topics Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

CCM 429 Topics in Civic Communication and Media (1-4)

A semester-long study of topic in Civic Communication and Media. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and Topics Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

CCM 490 Independent Study (4)

Individual program in which a student can study a topic not normally available in the department curriculum. A student could conduct critical or experimental research in the field or pursue a detailed program of study in specific areas of interest. Each independent study plan must have the approval of the Civic Communication and Media faculty.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 496W Senior Seminar (4)

Students will complete and present a major project that contributes to ongoing scholarly conversations regarding communication and media practices that foster civic engagement. Completion of the seminar, the career roadmap, and the comprehensive examination, will constitute the Senior Year Experience.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: CCM 221 and CCM 220W, and consent of instructor
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff
Willamette University

Civic Communication and Media

Address
900 State Street
Salem Oregon 97301 U.S.A.
Phone
503-370-6077

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