2014-2015

Civic Communication and Media

The program in Civic Communication and Media (CCM) focuses on communicative practices and technologies that foster engagement in civic life. Informed by theories and histories of public discourse, CCM courses are designed to develop thinkers who understand dynamics of communication and media change and who can apply their insights to contemporary problems.

Those who pursue the major or minor in Civic Communication and Media have the opportunity to explore how people devise and use media—whether speeches or tweets—to engage the world, to define and negotiate controversies, to construct identity and community, to develop and circulate arguments, and to effect change. In addition students who select this major will examine rhetorical practices through which individuals and groups establish, maintain and challenge structures of power in civic life.

CCM courses cultivate engaged practitioners who can analyze and work in multiple forms of communication, who are engaged in public life, and who contribute through research to public conversations about communication and media.

Students who entered the University in Fall 2013 or earlier may complete the Rhetoric and Media Studies (RHET) major as described in the 2013-14 catalog, or may choose to complete the new Civic Communication and Media (CCM) major. Those choosing to complete the new major must first consult the CCM department chair.

Students who enter the University in Fall 2014 or later will complete the new Civic Communication and Media (CCM) major.

Willamette University Debate Union

The Willamette University Debate Union debate program, housed in the CCM department, is available to any College of Liberal Arts students interested in intercollegiate debate competition. Work and competition is under the guidance of the Director and Assistant Director of Debate. For additional information see Willamette University Debate Union in this catalog.

Internships

Civic Communication and Media majors have the opportunity to participate in internships in political institutions and organizations, radio and television, newspapers, social and emerging media, non-profit organizations, and corporate communication. Students interested in internships should contact Professor Courtney Dillard, who is the internship coordinator, or their advisor.

Requirements for the Civic Communication and Media Major (8.25-9 Credits)

Communicating Effectively in Public (.25 – 1)

  • CCM 101 (EV) Public Speaking (1)
  • CCM 102 (EV) Argumentation, Advocacy and Debate (1)
  • CCM 103 Designing Media (1)
  • CCM 201 (EV) Arguing About the Right Thing to Do (1)
  • CCM 202 (EV) Designing Persuasive Campaigns (1)
  • IDS 062x Intercollegiate Debate (.25)
  • RHET 125 (CA) Creating Visual Rhetoric (1)

CCM Core (2)

Controversies in Public Discourse (1)

  • CCM 241 (EV) US Public Discourse in the Print Age (1)
  • CCM 242 (EV) US Public Discourse in the Broadcast Age (1)
  • CCM 243 (EV) US Public Discourse in the Internet Age (1)
  • CCM 341 US Women’s Rights Activism Before 1920 (1)
  • CCM 342 US Women’s Rights Activism Since 1920 (1)
  • CCM 343 Controversies in Northwest Public Discourse (1)
  • CCM 360 Topics in Public Discourse (1)

Senior Year Experience (1)

  • CCM 496W Seminar in Civic Communication and Media (1)

Electives (4)

Four additional courses in CCM. At least three electives must be at the 300 level.

These electives may be selected from any CCM courses. Up to two elective credits may be selected from the following courses outside of the CCM department:

Requirements for the Civic Communication and Media Minor (5.25-8 Credits)

Communicating Effectively in Public (.25 – 1)

  • CCM 101 (EV) Public Speaking (1)
  • CCM 102 (EV) Argumentation, Advocacy and Debate (1)
  • CCM 103 Designing Media (1)
  • CCM 201 (EV) Arguing About the Right Thing to Do (1)
  • CCM 202 (EV) Designing Persuasive Campaigns (1)
  • IDS 062x Intercollegiate Debate (.25)
  • RHET 125 (CA) Creating Visual Rhetoric (1)

CCM Core (2)

Controversies in Public Discourse (1)

  • CCM 241 (EV) US Public Discourse in the Print Age (1)
  • CCM 242 (EV) US Public Discourse in the Broadcast Age (1)
  • CCM 243 (EV) US Public Discourse in the Internet Age (1)
  • CCM 341 US Women’s Rights Activism Before 1920 (1)
  • CCM 342 US Women’s Rights Activism Since 1920 (1)
  • CCM 343 Controversies in Northwest Public Discourse (1)
  • CCM 360 Topics in Public Discourse (1)

Electives (2)

Two courses from the CCM curriculum. At least one of these courses must be at the 300 level.

These electives may be selected from any CCM courses. Up to one elective credit may be selected from the following courses outside of the CCM department:

Faculty

  • Cindy Koenig Richards, Associate Professor of Civic Communication and Media; Department Chair; Ringe Media Lab Director
  • Courtney Dillard, Continuing Instructor of Civic Communication and Media; Internship Director
  • David A. Douglass, Dean of Campus Life
  • Una Kimokeo-Goes, Continuing Instructor of Civic Communication and Media; Assistant Director, Debate Union
  • Robert Trapp , Professor of Civic Communication and Media; Director of Debate Union

Part-Time and Visiting Faculty

  • Matt Bost
  • Christopher Swift
  • Rollie Wisbrock

Course Listings

CCM 101 (EV) Public Speaking (1)

Communicating effectively to a public audience, with an emphasis on speech. Course covers development of arguments, consideration of audience and situation, organization of material, and multimodal presentation including effective use of visual technologies with oral communication.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Examining Values
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 102 (EV) Argumentation, Advocacy and Debate (1)

The basic structure of argumentation and advocacy are examined with a view toward being able to participate in debate and other public advocacy events. Topics for debate will be chosen from among those being debated in the public sphere. Each student will be required to participate in a minimum of six debates in order to complete the course.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Examining Values
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Trapp, Kimokeo-Goes

CCM 103 Designing Media (1)

Project based course focused on design of civic media. Provides community service learning opportunities for students interested in working with local organizations to address communication challenges. Considers the reciprocal relationship between media and public culture; examines participatory media technologies and practices; covers stages of project ideation, design, implementation, testing and evaluation.

  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Koenig Richards, Staff

CCM 201 (EV) Arguing About the Right Thing to Do (1)

The course investigates methods of arguing about ethics. First, students will be introduced to the general question of whether matters of right and wrong are susceptible to argument. are questions of right and wrong merely personal choices or do argumentative methods exist to distinguish right from wrong? Second, students will be introduced to various methods of arguing about ethical matters. Finally, these methods or argument will be applied to several examples of ethical questions prevalent in civic society, especially those including life and death, personal liberty, personal responsibility, and ethical rhetoric. The course also requires that students make presentations about ethical matters.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Examining Values
  • Offering: Alternating Years
  • Instructor: Trapp, Staff

CCM 202 (EV) Designing Persuasive Campaigns (1)

The primary aim of this course is to offer students the opportunity to creatively apply the core principles of rhetoric to a persuasive campaign they develop from start to finish. Students will learn about key rhetorical variables such as audience and context as well as major rhetorical tools ranging from argument to framing. In addition, the role of visual elements in persuasion will be explored. Each student will produce a complete campaign plan that will be presented in class. Student projects can focus on politics, corporate advocacy, and non-profit organization. Opportunities for working with organizations in the Salem community are available.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Examining Values
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Dillard

CCM 220W Analyzing Public Discourse (1)

A writing-centered course focusing on criteria for and approaches to the analysis of public discourse. Critical forms such as the analysis of situation, arguments, structure, style, power and media will be explored through case studies. Provides training in methods of analysis necessary for advanced coursework, including forms and rhetorical criticism..

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 221 Rhetorical Theory (1)

This course introduces key theoretical questions from the rhetorical tradition that continue to influence conversations about public discourse and media today. Prepares students to understand a variety of answers to these questions, to begin developing arguments in response to them, and to defend their views against common objections. Provides training in theoretical methods necessary for advanced coursework.

  • Prerequisite: CCM 220W or RHET 261W
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Koenig Richards, Staff

CCM 241 (EV) US Public Discourse in the Print Age (1)

Critical and historical examination of communication practices and media through which residents participated in public discourses, particularly to shape US identity and the meaning of citizenship, as well as to define and address national controversies. Surveys the period in which oral and print media governed US rhetoric.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Examining Values
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Kimokeo-Goes, Staff

CCM 242 (EV) US Public Discourse in the Broadcast Age (1)

Critical and historical examination of communication practices and media through which residents participated in public discourses, particularly to shape US identity and the meaning of citizenship, as well as to define and address national controversies. Surveys the period in which broadcast media (primarily radio and television) governed US rhetoric; attends to the rhetorical features of selected examples of oral, print, and broadcast media.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Examining Values
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 243 (EV) US Public Discourse in the Internet Age (1)

Critical and historical examination of communication practices and media through which residents participated in public discourses, particularly to shape US identity and the meaning of citizenship, as well as to define and address national controversies. Surveys the contemporary period, in which digital media govern US rhetoric, attending to the rhetoric features of selected examples of oral, print, broadcast and digital media.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Examining Values
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 260W (EV, IT) Media and the Environment (1)

Effective communication in front of an audience. Discovery and development of ideas, organization of material, use of language and the modes of presentation. Classroom speeches of different types, short papers, examinations.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Examining Values, Interpreting Texts
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Collins, Dillard

CCM 261 (EV) Persuasion and Mass Media (1)

Political rhetoric and advertising serve as case studies for the use and influence of persuasion in contemporary society. Special attention is paid to the role of the mass media in this process and to the ethics of persuasive techniques.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Examining Values
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 341 US Women's Rights Activism Before 1920 (1)

This course examines rhetorical practices through which advocates of equality cultivated political agency among disenfranchised Americans, developed a powerful movement for social change, and challenged norms that excluded women from the public sphere.

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Koenig Richards

CCM 342 US Women's Rights Activism Since 1920 (1)

This course examines rhetorical practices through which Americans since 1920 have developed and challenged feminist politics, redefined expectations for gender performance and public leadership, and pursued the promise of "liberty and justice for all" in the United States.

  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Koenig Richards

CCM 343 Controversies in the Northwest Public Discourse (1)

Project based course in which student identify and analyze communication and media through which residents, activists, organizations and policy makers engage a controversy in the Pacific Northwest. Potential topics include immigration, health care, marriage equality, land use and tribal sovereignty. After conducting and presenting critical analyses of existing public discourse, students will develop, carry out and present projects that aim to improve public participation and discourse related to the selected controversy.

  • Prerequisite: CCM 220W and CCM 221 or consent of instructor
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Dillard, Kimokeo-Goes, Staff

CCM 360 Topics in Public Discourse (1)

Students and faculty examine public discourse regarding special topics of interest or controversy. Topics may include climate change, immigration reform, the definition of marriage, and racial justice movements.

  • Prerequisite: CCM 220W or CCM 221 or consent of instructor
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 361 Citizenship and the Public Sphere (1)

Many formulations of rhetoric, citizenship and democracy assume the existence of "the public" and theorize the ideal "public sphere." In this course, we will examine scholarship about the public, investigate how civic engagement is shaped by this powerful term, and consider how conceptions of the public sphere can both facilitate deliberative democracy and reinforce inequalities.


CCM 362 Civic Media (1)

Comparative examination of uses of media to foster civic engagement. Through analysis of multimedia texts students consider concepts such as participatory culture, citizen journalism, transmedia activism, and civic, radical and tactical media. Case studies develop understanding of civic media across platforms (oral, print, broadcast, internet), contexts (local to global, past to present), and use (dialogic, contentious, hacktivist).

  • Prerequisite: CCM 220W or RHET 261W
  • Offering: Spring semester
  • Instructor: Koenig Richards,Staff

CCM 363 Technologies of Public Discourse (1)

Examines selected controversies about the introduction of new media and their effects upon public communication. Begins with debates over the introduction of writing and the transition from oral to print cultures. Concludes with discussions of how the history of previous communication technologies can help us to negotiate the transformations of public discourse that accompany electronic media today and the new media of the future. Develops skills introduced in both Rhetoric Theory and the US Public Discourse series.

  • Prerequisite: CCM 221, RHET 326, CCM 220W, or RHET 261W
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Koenig Richards, Staff

CCM 364W Political Communication (1)

This course develops a rhetorical framework for understanding campaign communication, the symbolic nature of the presidency and the way groups and the media control political realities. Language is studied as a symbolic means of creating and projecting images and issues.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Prerequisite: CCM 220W or RHET 261W
  • Offering: Fall semester
  • Instructor: Dillard, Staff

CCM 365 (US) Rhetorics of Sex and Gender (1)

This course explores the role of gender performativity in the creation, practice, and criticism of rhetoric. Students will investigate the relationship between sex and gender, analyze the ways that relationship is used as an interpretive lens for popular and political communication, and consider the role of mediation in the rhetorical construction of gender identity.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Understanding Society
  • Prerequisite: CCM 220W/RHET 261W, CCM 221/RHET 326, or WGS course
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 366 Ethics of Public Argument (1)

Examines advanced problems involved in theorizing the ethics of argumentation in the public sphere. Prepares students to understand the complexity of these problems, to begin developing informed responses to them, and to adapt such theoretical positions to the analysis and production of public argument. Develops skills introduced in Analyzing Public Discourse and Rhetorical Theory.

  • Prerequisite: CCM 221
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Trapp, Staff

CCM 367 Networked Social Movements (1)

Investigates relationships between social movements and the media, with particular attention to communication practices that connect, radicalize and empower marginalized community members. Course participants will explore frameworks, methods and concepts--such as pre-inception rhetoric, counterpublicity, movement structure and cycles, tactical media, and oscillation--for understanding networked social movements, past and present.


CCM 394/5 Internship (.5-1)

This course is offered to sophomores, juniors and seniors majoring in Civic Communication and Media. The instructor will work with students to help acquire internships in the Salem/Portland area and oversee the internship as it progresses throughout the semester. A variety of internship placements will be pursued including those in the non-profit, political and corporate sectors. Internships will focus on communication activities such as audience research, message development and outreach tactics. Students will be asked to complete short assignments throughout the internship, as well as turn in a final synopsis paper. Interested students should contact the instructor the semester prior to their internship in order to secure a worthwhile position.

  • Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Dillard

CCM 490 Independent Study (1)

Individual program in which a student can study a topic not normally available in the department curriculum. A student could conduct critical or experimental research in the field or pursue a detailed program of study in specific areas of interest. Each independent study plan must have the approval of the Civic Communication and Media faculty.

  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

CCM 496W Senior Seminar (1)

Students will complete and present a major project that contributes to ongoing scholarly conversations regarding communication and media practices that foster civic engagement. Completion of the seminar, the career roadmap, and the comprehensive examination, will constitute the Senior Year Experience.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Prerequisite: CCM 221 or RHET 326, and CCM 220W or RHET 261W
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

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