Events and Calendars

Fall 2015 - Spring 2016

To see an archive of past events go here.

NOTE - Click on EVENT TITLE to go to Events page for additional information

April 28, 2016

7:30 p.m.
Fire, Climate, and Society in the Ancient Southwest: Ancient Lessons for a Sustainable Future?, Hatfield Room, Mark O. Hatfield Library, Willamette University

Dr. Christopher Roos, Southern Methodist University

In the Southwest US, a century of fire suppression has turned old growth forests into tinderboxes that burn in increasingly destructive ways as the climate warms. But do all fire-climate-society relationships conform to this story? Southwestern pine forests have been home to American Indian communities for millennia. How did these communities cope with – and impact – these flammable forests through variable climates? What lessons might we learn from these experiences? Dr. Christopher Roos brings archaeological, tree-ring, and geological information together to weave a story of human and climatic impacts on Arizona’s fire-prone forests over the last millennium to illuminate pathways towards stainable fire-climate-society relationships.

Co-sponsored by the Environmental and Earth Sciences Department.

PLEASE NOTE THE DIFFERENT LOCATION!

 

January 28, 2016

7:30 p.m.
Jomon Food Diversity, Climate Change and Long-Term Sustainability: Lessons from Prehistoric Japan (Henry Luce Foundation Lecture), Paulus Lecture Hall, Willamette University College of Law

Dr. Junko Habu, UC Berkeley

Archaeologists have long been interested in the study of the mechanisms of long-term social change.  Factors that involve specialization and centralization, such as domestication of plants, technological developments and social competitions, have been proposed as prime movers for the “development” of human societies.  Contrary to these interpretations, this presentation proposes a hypothesis that diversity and decentralization may be critical for maintaining long-term sustainability of human societies in the order of hundreds to tens of thousands of years.  Using a case study from the Early and Middle Jomon periods (ca. 6000-4400 cal. BP) of prehistoric Japan, this presentation emphasizes the importance of framing recent and current global environmental problems in the context of the greater human experiences.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Ancient Studies and Archaeology (CASA), the Center for Asian Studies (CAS), and the Henry Luce Foundation (Sustainability and the Pacific Rim Grant)

February 4, 2016

7:30 p.m.
To Be Diné in the American West: The Archaeology of Nineteenth Century Navajo Cultural Persistence, Paulus Lecture Hall, Willamette University College of Law

Dr. Kerry F. Thompson, Department of Anthropology, Northern Arizona University

As a symbolic representation of the Diné universe, the hogan represents a life lived in pursuit of beauty and balance and is a material representation of Diné philosophy and worldview. Using Diné philosophy as an interpretive tool, this project investigates the archaeological evidence for cultural persistence among late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century Diné hogan households. Analysis of a sample of hogan sites recorded as evidence for the Navajo Land Claim case indicate that hogan architecture persisted in form and function in the face of intensive American contact, intrusive colonial policies, and profound changes in other areas of Diné social and cultural life. The dialectic between colonial policy and traditional Dine culture did not alter the core of Diné identity as it is represented in Diné architecture, persistent settlement patterns, and decision making about movement on the landscape.

Co-sponsored by Native American Programs at Willamette University.

February 18, 2016

7:30 p.m.
Adventure and Discovery aboard a Pre-Columbian Balsa Raft (AIA Stone Lecture), Paulus Lecture Hall, Willamette University College of Law

John Haslett, Author & Explorer

In September 1526, off the coast of what is now modern-day Ecuador, two vessels met on the Pacific Ocean. One was Spanish and most likely a caravel. The other was a balsa raft, carrying “sails and rope as fine as anything in Castile.” The mariners aboard this unusual vessel are today classified as the Manteño-Huancavilca. At their height they numbered roughly sixty thousand, had at least five major chiefdoms on the coast, and had an economy based on sea transportation. In the time before the Spaniards, Manteño balsa rafts carried Inka dignitaries and regular freight alike.

The vessel the Spanish caravel encountered in 1526 was a balsa raft that came from the chiefdom of Salango, and in 1995, the author and his colleagues went to this tiny fishing village, which still has a thriving maritime culture, to begin building their first balsa raft.

Over the next five years, the author and his team sailed balsa rafts for 125 days and lived aboard those vessels for an additional 90 days in various ports and anchorages. Their voyages were punctuated by “madness, mutiny, mud, terror, desperation, failure, disease, death, the surreal, and the sublime.” In that time, and in the years afterward, they have emerged with a unique view of the Manteño raft, its abilities, its limitations, and its impact on pre-Columbian trade in northwestern South America.

Join writer John Haslett for a fascinating look at life aboard a raft at sea. The author will share stories, video, and still images from his voyages, and then summarize the sightings of sailing rafts throughout history, the important features of each of those vessels, and the questions that still remain concerning construction and navigation of pre-Columbian watercraft.

March 10, 2016

7:30 p.m.
Timely Remedies: The Ancient Medicine of Ötzi the Iceman, Paulus Lecture Hall, Willamette University College of Law

Dr. Patrick Hunt, Stanford University

The almost perfectly preserved remains of “Ötzi the Iceman”, a 5,300-year-old Copper Age / Neolithic man whose body was discovered in 1991 in the Ötztal Alps at 10,500 ft. between Italy and Austria, may give us a glimpse into medicine practiced by prehistoric peoples. We know that “Ötzi” carried a medical kit with him – his own portable pharmacy with over ten different plant products that could heal and cure. Discoveries about ancient medical techniques may be possible studying Ötzi’s singular case.

Amazing forensic science has recovered much detail about Ötzi’s life. This lecture explores the medical evidence, including material technology he carried, with vital medical and bioarchaeological data. This is research conducted under the auspices of National Geographic and the Institute for EthnoMedicine where Hunt is also a Research Associate in Archeoethnobotany. Hunt has filmed several documentaries (2008, 2010) for National Geographic on Ötzi and is currently involved in a third production (2015).

Short bibliography and/or website on lecture topic:

“PBS NOVA Iceman Murder Mystery” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JySYyTA4Eo

http://www.ethnomedicine.org/about/team.asp

March 18-19, 2016

2:30–3:30 p.m.
Classical Association of the Pacific Northwest (CAPN) , Evergreen State College (March 21-25 Spring Break)

April 5, 2016

7:30 p.m.
War, Love, and Victory: From Ishtar to Aphrodite to Venus, Paulus Lecture Hall, Willamette University College of Law

Stephanie Budin (University of Oregon)

Co-sponsored by the Hallie Ford Museum of Art and the Department of Art History at Willamette University.

April 23, 2016

*Watch the Willamette University Classics Department website for additional details

September 17, 2015

7:30 PM
Dr. Robin Rhodes, Department of Art, Art History, and Design, University of Notre Dame

September 29, 2015

7:00 p.m.

Color, 117 minutes

As a prelude to Robert Edsel’s lecture on Oct. 15, the Emmy award winning PBS documentary, The Rape of Europa, will be shown on Tuesday, Sept. 29 and Tuesday, Oct.13 at 7:00 p.m. in the Roger Hull Lecture Hall at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. The film tells the epic story of the theft, destruction and survival of Europe’s art treasures during the Third Reich and World War II. Actress Joan Allen narrates this breathtaking chronicle about the battle over the very survival of Western civilization.


 

October 1, 2015

7:30 p.m.

Dr. Scott Pike, Associate Professor of Environmental Science, Geology, and Archaeology, Environmental and Earth Sciences Department, Willamette University

October 13, 2015

7:00 p.m.
Color, 117 minutes

As a prelude to Robert Edsel’s lecture on Oct. 15, the Emmy award winning PBS documentary, The Rape of Europa, will be shown on Tuesday, Sept. 29 and Tuesday, Oct.13 at 7:00 p.m. in the Roger Hull Lecture Hall at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. The film tells the epic story of the theft, destruction and survival of Europe’s art treasures during the Third Reich and World War II. Actress Joan Allen narrates this breathtaking chronicle about the battle over the very survival of Western civilization.

October 15, 2015

7:30 p.m.

Mr. Robert Edsel, director of the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art in Dallas, Texas, and a New York Times bestselling author and producer

October 22, 2015

7:30 p.m.
Prof. James A.R. Nafziger, College of Law, Willamette University
Prof. Robert K. Paterson, Peter A. Allard School of Law, University of British Columbia

November 5, 2015

7:30 p.m.
Dr. James Cuno '73, President and CEO of the J. Paul Getty Trust

November 12, 2015

7:30 p.m.
Dr. Katherine A. Schwab, Fairfield University
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