Lucas Ettinger, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Exercise and Health Science
Specialties: Human Anatomy, Biomechanics

Education

PhD, Orthopedic Biomechanics, University of Oregon

MS, Orthopedic Biomechanics, University of Oregon

BS, Human Physiology, University of Oregon

Bio

Dr. Ettinger joined Willamette University and the Department of Exercise and Health Science in 2014.  Prior to Willamette, Ettinger was an anatomy instructor at Saba University School of Medicine in the Dutch Netherland Antilles. His courses include; Human Anatomy, Research Design, Biomechanics, Motor Control and Medical Ethics. In his time at Willamette, he has published 5 peer-reviewed original articles in both clinically relevant and high impact scientific journals. Several students in Dr. Ettinger's laboratories have received co-authorship on these publications.  You can find Dr. Ettinger dissecting cadavers in the newly renovated Human Anatomy Laboratory (408 Collins) or, sometimes he can also be found in his office (406 Collins).  

Research

Dr. Ettinger's laboratory has ongoing clinical research in the area of neuromuscular disorders. He has investigated the influence of various pain disorders on muscle and joint coordination and sensory integration. His most recent work investigates neuropathic pain disorders such as Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and their influence on perception of limb movement (proprioception).  

Courses

Human Anatomy (BIOL 246)

Research Design (EXHS 356W)

Dissecting Medical Ethics (IDS 101)

Biomechanics (EXHS 347)

Motor Control (EXHS 357)

Senior Seminar (EXHS 496).  

Advising

Professor Ettinger advises current students in Exercise and Health Science, transfer students, Pre-Health and Allied Health professions. He is the official Willamette adviser for students on the Allied Health track. 

Publications

Refereed Research Papers

Ettinger L, Ostrander T.  Gravitational Torque Partially Explains Proprioceptive Acuity.  Human Movement Science. 2018.

Ettinger L, Boucher A, Simonovich E.  Patients with type 2 Diabetes Demonstrate Proprioceptive Deficit in the Knee. World Journal of Diabetes. 2018.

Ettinger L, Shapiro M, Karduna A.  Subacromial Anesthetics Increase Proprioceptive Deficit in the Shoulder and Elbow in Patients With Subacromial

Impingement Syndrome.  Clinical Medicine Insights: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders. 2017. 

Ettinger L, Weiss J, Shapiro M, Karduna A. Normalization to Maximal Voluntary Contraction is Influenced by Subacromial Pain. J Appl Biomech. Apr 26 2016.

Ettinger L, Shapiro, M, Karduna A.  Subacromial Injection Results in Further Scapular Dyskinesis.  Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine.  2014. 8(2).

Ettinger L, Kincl L, Johnson P, Garfinkle S, Karduna A. Workday Arm Elevation Exposure, a Comparison between two Professions. IIE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors. 2013; 1(2): 119-127

Ettinger L, McClure P, Kincl L, Karduna A. Exposure to a workday environment results in an increase in anterior tilting of the scapula in dental hygienists with greater employment experience. Clinical Biomechanics. 27(4): 341-345, 2012


Refereed Abstracts 

Simonovich E, Ettinger L. (2017). Diabetic Neuropathy Results in Reduced Proprioceptive Acuity in the Knee. Murdock College Science Research Conference.  Gonzaga University, Washington.

Boucher A, Ettinger L.  (2016).  Diabetic Neuropathy on Knee Joint Position Sense.  Murdock College Science Research Conference.  Gonzaga University, Washington.

Ostrander T, Ettinger L. (2016).  Joint Torque Partially Accounts for Proprioceptive Acuity. Northwest Biomechanics Symposium. Vancouver, British Colombia. 

Ostrander T, Ettinger L. (2015).  Joint Torque Partially Accounts for Proprioceptive Acuity. Murdock College Science Research Conference.  Vancouver, Washington

Grants and Awards

Atkinson Research Expense Award (2018). 

Recent Presentations and Moderations

Northwest Biomechanics Symposium, Western Washington University, Bellingham WA, 2018. 

Murdock College Science Research Program, Gonzaga University, Spokane WA, 2017. Presentation: Diabetic Neuropathy Results in Reduced Proprioceptive Acuity in the Knee. 

Northwest Biomechaninics Symposium, University of Oregon, Eugene OR, 2017.  Moderator. “Upper Extremity Biomechanics.”

Human Anatomy and Physiology Symposium, Salt Lake City, UT, 2017.

Murdock College Science Research Program, Gonzaga University, Spokane WA, 2016.  Presentation: “Diabetic Neuropathy on Knee Joint Position Sense.”

Northwest Biomechanics Symposium, University of British Colombia, Vancouver BC, 2016.  Presentation: “Internal Torque Partially Accounts for Proprioceptive Acuity in the Shoulder.”

Murdock College Science Research Program, Vancouver WA, 2015.  “Internal Torque Partially Accounts for Proprioceptive Acuity in the Shoulder.”

Northwest Biomechanics Symposium, Willamette University, Salem OR, 2014.  Moderator “Upper Extremity Biomechanics.”

International Shoulder Group (ISB) Aberystwyth University Wales UK, 2012. “Subacromial Injection Results in Further Scapular Dyskenisis.”

Northwest Biomechaninics Symposium, University of Oregon, Eugene OR, 2012.  “Subacromial Injection results in Altered Scapular Kinematics and Muscle Recruitment Patterns.”

American Society of Biomechanics, University of Southern California, Long Beach CA, 2011.  “Arm Elevation Exposure, a Comparison Between Two Professions.”

Northwest Biomechaninics Symposium, University of British Colombia, Vancouver BC, 2011.  “Arm Elevation Exposure, a Comparison Between Two Professions.”

American Society of Biomechanics, Brown University, Providence RI, 2010.  “Alterations in Shoulder Joint Perception Pre and Post Workday .”

Northwest Biomechaninics Symposium, University of Washington, Seattle WA, 2010.  “Joint position sense in Dental Hygienists Pre and Post Workday.”

American Society of Biomechanics, Penn State University, State College PA, 2009.  “Scapular Kinematics of Dental Hygienists Pre and Post Workday.”

Northwest Biomechaninics Symposium, Washington State University, Pullman WA, 2009.  “Scapular Kinematics of Dental Hygienists Pre and Post Workday.” 


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