Hawai’i Club presents 30th Lū’au

by University Communications,

  • Students dance in a line at the lū’au
  • Professor with flower in hair dances onstage at lū’au
  • Students in Hawaiian shirts dancing
  • People onstage reaching out to crowd members
  • dancers onstage
  • wide view of three dancers onstage in white dresses with arms extended
  • Tolo Tuitele touches a flaming baton to their tongue
  • Tolo Tuitele with a flaming baton
  • Two students dance
  • students in white dance in a line
  • Four dancers wearing black
  • Students in straw hats dancing
  • Student with a crown of leaves and white shirt dances with arms outstretched
  • Two students stand back-to-back and blow into large shells
  • Students serve food
  • plate of noodles, fruit and more
  • a table covered with leis and sign: "Lei $1"
  • visitors look at merchandise at the event's store

Student-run evening of entertainment celebrated the rich history of Polynesian music.

Willamette’s Hawai’i Club commemorated the origins of Hawai’i’s sacred lands during the club’s 30th lu’au April 27. This year’s theme, “Nā One Hānau: The Sands of Our Birth,” centered on how the islands’ history and culture entwine with legends of sacred lands. 

The lū’au is presented by the Hawai’i Club in collaboration with the Office of Multicultural Affairs. The event is completely planned and organized by student committees. The dances are choreographed and taught by students. Tolo Tuitele, a regular part of the lū’au, performed a fire knife dance.

Scroll through the photos above for a photo gallery of the evening’s festivities. View the program for a list of student choreographers and a description the dances.

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