Global Cultural Studies

Global Cultural Studies focuses on the interconnected elements of diverse world cultures, such as their social relations, power structures, mass media, rituals, health practices, languages, literature, art, and history.

The Global Cultural Studies faculty are experts in multiple disciplines, including Anthropology, Archaeology, Art History, Asian Studies, Chinese, French, German, History, Japanese, PHEAL, Philosophy, Russian, Spanish, Theatre, and other areas. Throughout their coursework, Global Cultural Studies students develop skills in close reading, pattern detection, critical analysis, and original thinking, with an emphasis on promoting cross-cultural understanding.

Career Opportunities in Global Cultural Studies

Given today's diverse and interconnected world, Global Cultural Studies provides students with excellent preparation for careers in education, business, health, social services, law, the arts, and more.

Requirements for the Global Cultural Studies Major (36 Semester Hours)

Core courses (8 semester hours)

  • GCS 105 Introduction to Global Cultural Studies (4)
  • GCS 499W Senior Seminar in Global Cultural Studies (4)*

*If projected enrollments for the upcoming academic year are not sufficiently high, the chair of Global Cultural Studies will notify rising senior majors in GCS that this class will not be offered that year. Instead, those senior majors will take a class in any category in the major that is 300-level or higher, and write a substantial paper in that class. Before registering for such a class, students must ask the instructor for permission and specific Senior Capstone directions.

Anthropology (4 semester hours)

Take 4 semester hours with an ANTH prefix.

  • ANTH 144 Topics in Cultural Anthropology (4)
  • ANTH 231 Native North American Cultures (4)
  • ANTH 232 Peoples and Cultures of Africa (4)
  • ANTH 235 Cultures of Mexico and Ecuador (4)
  • ANTH 258 Selected Area Studies (4)
  • ANTH 335 Visual Anthropology (4)
  • ANTH 344 Medical Anthropology (4)
  • ANTH 351 Indigenous Peoples, Human Rights, and the Environment (4)
  • ANTH 356 Language and Culture (4)
  • ANTH 358 Special Topics in Anthropology (4)
  • ANTH 394 Internship in Anthropology (4)
  • ANTH 399 Topics in Anthropology (1-4)
  • ANTH 429 Topics in Anthropology (1-4)
  • ANTH 490 Independent Study (2 or 4)

Cultural Electives, Part A (16 semester hours)

Take 16 semester hours from the following approved list of electives that focus on different cultures around the world, including the United States.

  • ANTH 144 Topics in Cultural Anthropology (4)
  • ANTH 231 Native North American Cultures (4)
  • ANTH 232 Peoples and Cultures of Africa (4)
  • ANTH 235 Cultures of Mexico and Ecuador (4)
  • ANTH 258 Selected Area Studies (4)
  • ANTH 335 Visual Anthropology (4)
  • ANTH 344 Medical Anthropology (4)
  • ANTH 351 Indigenous Peoples, Human Rights, and the Environment (4)
  • ANTH 356 Language and Culture (4)
  • ANTH 358 Special Topics in Anthropology (4)
  • ANTH 394 Internship in Anthropology (4)
  • ANTH 399 Topics in Anthropology (1-4)
  • ANTH 429 Topics in Anthropology (1-4)
  • ANTH 490 Independent Study (2 or 4)
  • ARCH 237 Introduction to Global Archaeology (4)
  • ARCH 337 Archaeological Theories and Methods (4)
  • ARTH 243 Contemporary Art: 1970-present (4)
  • ARTH 263 Baroque and Neoclassical Visual Culture (4)
  • ARTH 267 Renaissance Visual Culture (4)
  • ASIA 201 Gateway to East Asian Studies (4)
  • ASIA 210 Making and Playing of Traditional Musical Instruments (4)
  • ASIA 288 Introducing Asia to the World (4)
  • ASIA 301 Asian Visual and Creative Culture (4)
  • ASIA 352 Field Study in Asia (4)
  • CHNSE 254 Folklore and Identity (4)
  • CHNSE 258 Gender and Mass Communication in Asia (4)
  • CHNSE 269 Chinese Society and Media (4)
  • CHNSE 352 Rites of Passage in Chinese Societies (4)
  • FREN 275 African Cinema (4)
  • FREN 285W  Gender and Sexuality in African Literature and Cinema (4)
  • FREN 331W French Composition and Discussion (4)
  • FREN 336 France and the Other (4)
  • FREN 337 French and Francophone Studies II (4)
  • FREN 340 Readings in French Literature (4)
  • FREN 341 Oral Tradition and Performance in African Literature (4)
  • FREN 430 Civilization and Its Critics (4)
  • FREN 432 Language in Society (4)
  • FREN 439 Advanced Topics in French Literature (4)
  • GERM 241 German Cinema and Visual Culture (4)
  • GERM 333 Contemporary German Culture (4)
  • GERM 432 Media in Context: Literature, Film and Art (4)
  • HIST 233 Asian Empires on the Silk Road (4)
  • HIST 256 Colonial Latin America (4)
  • HIST 270 Cinema in the Middle East (4)
  • IDS 205 Chemawa Indian School Partnership Program (2)
  • IDS 250W Narratives of Migration: From Islamic Spain to the US/Mexico Border (4)
  • IDS 396 Chemawa Indian School Partnership Program Internship (2 or 4)
  • JAPN 201W Modern Japanese Society and Culture (4)
  • JAPN 314W Japanese Literature in Translation (4)
  • JAPN 340 The Japanese Cinema (4)
  • PHEAL 120 Global Health through Film (4)
  • PHIL 112/113W Philosophy and Religion (4)
  • PHIL 370W Philosophy of Language (4)
  • RUSS 233W Russian Culture: Russian Ways and Views of Russia (4)
  • RUSS 235 Russian and Soviet Cinema (4)
  • RUSS 320W The Nineteenth-Century Russian Novel (4)
  • RUSS 325 Topics in Russian Literature (4)
  • RUSS 333 Russian Civilization and Culture (4)
  • SPAN 331W Spanish Composition and Discussion (4)
  • SPAN 332 Spanish Conversation and Culture (4)
  • SPAN 333 Hispanic Civilization (4)
  • SPAN 335 Cultural Institutions of Spain (4)
  • SPAN 352 Peninsular Literature I: Medieval, Early Modern, and American Colonial (4)
  • SPAN 353 Peninsular Literature II: Modern and Contemporary (4)
  • SPAN 355 Latin American Literature I: Conquest to Independence (4)
  • SPAN 356 Latin American Literature II: Modernismo to the Present (4)
  • SPAN 365 Spanish Translation (4)
  • SPAN 380 Latin American Cinema (4)
  • SPAN 399 Topics in Spanish (1-4)
  • SPAN 427 Topics in Latin American Literature (4)
  • SPAN 428 Contemporary Mexican Literature (4)
  • SPAN 430 History of Hispanic Thought (4)
  • SPAN 431 Contemporary Novel and Short Story of Latin America (4)
  • SPAN 435 Contemporary Latin American Women Writers (4)
  • SPAN 438 Contemporary Spanish Women Writers (4)
  • SPAN 445 Topics in Medieval and Early Modern Spanish Literature (4)
  • SPAN 446 Topics in Modern and Contemporary Peninsular Literature (4)
  • THTR 212 Global Fashion History (4)

Cultural Electives, Part B (8 semester hours)

Take two classes (8 semester hours) that meet the following conditions: .

  1. Most importantly, these two classes can be chosen from Cultural Electives, Part A, but they must have a prefix of CHNSE, FREN, GERM, JAPN, RUSS, or SPAN.
  2. These two classes can be at any level and from any one or two of the non-English language programs just mentioned. For instance, a student may choose one class at the 100-level with a GERM prefix and another at the 200-level with a SPAN prefix, or they may choose two classes with the same prefix at any level.
  3. These two classes can focus on any topic, such as language instruction, cinema, literature, or other cultural forms.
  4. These two classes can be taught in English.
  5. Note, however, that the two classes that fulfill this Global Cultural Studies requirement cannot be the same classes that a student uses to meet Willamette’s non-English General Education requirement; they must be different, additional classes. These two classes can count for any other General Education requirement, just not the non-English General Education requirement.
  6. Also, this requirement in Global Cultural Studies cannot be fulfilled through a language proficiency exam or AP/IB credit.

Stipulations

Students majoring in Global Cultural studies cannot count for GCS major credit more than four classes from any single course prefix, unless the courses have an ANTH or GCS prefix, in which case there is no limit.

The GCS major values training in areas of transregional and global connection. Thus, students are required to take one course from at least three of the following world region categories: 1) North America or Europe, 2) Central or South America, 3) Africa, 4) Asia, 5) Middle East, or 6) Global (students are allowed to take 2 of these 3 courses from the Global category). Students can choose these three regional classes from any category in the major (Core, Anthropology, Cultural Electives). No classes can count in more than one category in the major. Classes, supervised research, or internship work done during study abroad may qualify for GCS credit, but must be approved by the GCS chair. With GCS chair approval, "Special Topics" and other courses at Willamette may also count for GCS credit and will at that time be assigned to the proper regional category.

Students must take two credits at the 300-level or above. These 300/400-level classes can be from Anthropology or Cultural Electives A or B, but not Senior Capstone.

 

Requirements for the Global Cultural Studies Minor (20 Semester Hours)

Core courses

  • GCS 105 Introduction to Global Cultural Studies (4)
  • One course from the Anthropology Category (see major above) (4)
  • Three additional courses from any category in the GCS major: Core, Anthropology, Cultural Electives A or B (see major above) (12)

Stipulations

Students minoring in Global Cultural Studies are required to take one course from at least two of the following world region categories: 1) North America or Europe, 2) Central or South America, 3) Africa, 4) Asia, 5) Middle East, or 6) Global (students are allowed to take both courses from the Global category). Students can choose these two regional classes from any category in the minor. Classes, supervised research, or internship work done during study abroad may qualify for GCS credit, but must be approved by the GCS chair. With GCS chair approval, "Special Topics" and other courses at Willamette may also count for GCS credit and will at that time be assigned to the proper regional category.

Indicators of Achievement

The major in the Department of Global Culture Studies is designed around four curricular goals.

The Student Learning Outcomes of the Global Cultural Studies Department Include

  1. Expand intercultural competence through multiple learning approaches, including language training, literary analysis, and social-science research.
  2. Explain complex social relations with regard to factors such as gender, equality, race, nationality, socioeconomic status, religion, age and more, between and among peoples from diverse parts of the world.
  3. Critically evaluate texts in a broad sense, such as artistic verbal, written, and visual texts, academic publications, and news sources.
  4. Understand contemporary issues and power dynamics among diverse people, such as issues related to cultural representation and appropriation, intellectual property, reparations, migration, repatriation, and more.

Faculty

  • Rebecca J. Dobkins, Professor of Anthropology, Curator of Native American Art - Hallie Ford Museum of Art
  • Joyce V. Millen, Associate Professor of Anthropology, African Studies and Public Health Ethics, Advocacy and Leadership,
  • Peter Wogan, Professor of Anthropology and Global Cultural Studies

Professors Emeriti

Administrative Assistant


Course Listings

GCS 105 Introduction to Global Cultural Studies (4)

This course provides a broad introduction to the comparative study of peoples, cultures, and languages from major regions of the world. Topical themes may include language and culture; ritual and religion; power and hegemony; race and racism; class and inequality; gender and sexuality; local and global environment; health and healing; internal and transnational migration; ethnicity and nationalism; and kinship, family, and marriage. Students will explore varied ways of learning about cultural similarities and differences, as well as local, regional, national, and international interconnections and power dynamics among groups. They will examine how divergent sources of popular and academic literature, news, film, and ethnographic works represent cultures and provide—or do not provide—political-economic context.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: PDE; World Engagement: CV
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

GCS 199 Topics in Global Cultural Studies (1-4)

A semester-long study of topics in Global Cultural Studies. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and Topics Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

GCS 299 Topics in Global Cultural Studies (1-4)

A semester-long study of topics in Global Cultural Studies. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and Topics Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

GCS 399 Topics in Global Cultural Studies (1-4)

A semester-long study of topics in Global Cultural Studies. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and Topics Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

GCS 429 Topics in Global Cultural Studies (1-4)

A semester-long study of topics in Global Cultural Studies. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and Topics Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

GCS 499W Senior Seminar in Global Cultural Studies (4)

This course serves as the Senior Capstone for majors in Global Cultural Studies, but is also open to minors in Global Cultural Studies and any students interested in the study of world cultures. Students will engage in research on a specific topic related to global cultures. Based on the students’ interests, the instructor will suggest a range of topics, methods, and scholarly literature. Afterwards, students will choose and formulate individual research questions, investigate those questions in-depth, and present their original findings and analyses.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered
  • Prerequisite: Senior standing or instructor consent
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff

ANTH 144 Topics in Cultural Anthropology (4)

This course provides the flexibility to offer special topics of interest in anthropology at the introductory level. The course may study a particular anthropological problem, focus upon a particular cultural or geographic area, or consider a particular methodology or school of thought. Designation of specific topic and/or approach will be made at the time of the course offering. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Social Sciences; World Engagement: CV
  • Offering: As Appropriate
  • Instructor: Staff

ANTH 150 Controversies and Issues in Cultural Anthropology (4)

Introduces students to cultural anthropology, the study of cultures from various parts of the world, including the U.S. Through debates, close readings of cultural case studies, and problem-solving, students critically evaluate anthropologists' approaches to topics such as gender, ecology, power, and ritual. Possible questions: How to explain gender inequalities? Are universal morals and cultural relativism at odds? Is human behavior learned or inherited?

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Social Sciences; PDE; World Engagement: CV
  • Prerequisite: 1st and 2nd year students only
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

ANTH 199 Topics in Anthropology (1-4)

A semester-long study of topics in Anthropology. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and Topics Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Instructor: Staff

ANTH 231 Indigenous Peoples of North America (4)

This course offers a survey of the dynamic, changing cultures of Native North America, from the time of the first peopling of the continent to the present day. The approach emphasizes the diversity of these cultures, as well as the complexity of the relationships between Native American and non-native peoples. Particular attention given to Oregon and the Northwest.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Social Sciences; PDE; World Engagement: CV
  • Prerequisite: ANTH 150 recommended
  • Offering: Fall semester
  • Instructor: Dobkins

ANTH 232 Peoples and Cultures of Africa (4)

This course explores Africa's cultural diversity from an interdisciplinary perspective. To situate specific African groups in their local and global context, the course begins with a study of African geography and history. The bulk of the course is then devoted to the study of present-day Africa, including ethnographic studies on language, literature, social organization, religion, politics and popular culture. The last unit of the class focuses on the causes and consequences of Africa's current upheavals and humanitarian crises.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Social Sciences;PDE; World Engagement: CV
  • Offering: Fall
  • Instructor: Millen

ANTH 235 Cultures of Mexico and Ecuador (4)

This course focuses on the cultures of Mexico and Ecuador, with the primary focus on Mexico, including the experience of Mexican-Americans. Topics include ethnicity, gender, class, religion, healing, immigration, and politics. Many of the units are organized around first-person accounts, as read through the lens of anthropological theories.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Social Sciences; World Engagement: CV
  • Offering: Spring
  • Instructor: Wogan

ANTH 258 Selected Area Studies (4)

This course enables faculty and students to study a specific geographic or cultural area not normally covered in existing curricula. Anthropological perspectives will be applied to such topics as history, environment, family, religion, popular culture and the arts, and current issues in the area under study. Designation of specific area focus will be made at the time of the course offering. Foci, readings, and assignments will vary with instructor. May be repeated for credit with different area focus.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Social Sciences; World Engagement: CV
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

ANTH 299 Topics in Anthropology (1-4)

A semester-long study of topics in Anthropology. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and Topics Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Instructor: Staff

ANTH 303 Museum Studies Seminar (4)

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the field of museum anthropology and to the theoretical and practical dimensions of museum studies. As an applied research experience, it offers the opportunity to do hands-on work with the Native American collection and exhibition program at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. Topics include the application of contemporary anthropological theory to work in museums, particularly in terms of issues of cultural representation, ethics, fieldwork, and museum display. Students will learn and apply skills in collections and archival management, exhibition development, and museum public programming.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences; PDE
  • Prerequisite: ANTH 231 or ANTH 351, and consent of instructor
  • Offering: As Appropriate
  • Instructor: Dobkins

ANTH 335 Visual Anthropology (4)

This course focuses on a variety of visual texts, from documentary films about non-Western cultures to fictional films made in the U.S. Special emphasis is placed on questions about visual representations of other cultures, and the way audience responses to visual texts reflect cultural values. Students will carry out independent fieldwork projects, in some cases making use of video-recording technologies.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Prerequisite: One previous anthropology course; preference given to Anthropology Majors and Minors
  • Offering: As Appropriate
  • Instructor: Wogan

ANTH 344 Medical Anthropology (4)

This course introduces students to medical anthropology. By exploring human health, sickness and healing from diverse theoretical and cross-cultural perspectives, students will learn how different peoples around the world conceptualize the human body, explain the causes of disease, manage patients and healers, contend with stress, and articulate the meaning and origin of social suffering. The course has a service learning component.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Social Sciences
  • Prerequisite: One course in Anthropology and/or consent of instructor
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Millen

ANTH 351 Indigenous Peoples, Human Rights and the Environment (4)

This course focuses upon environmental and human rights issues affecting indigenous peoples worldwide. Using the cross-cultural, comparative and field-based perspectives that distinguish anthropology, this course examines some of the most pressing problems facing the world's indigenous peoples, explores strategies used by these groups in facing human rights and environmental violations, and offers students the opportunity to study about and take action on these issues. Case studies of specific indigenous groups will be drawn from different world areas, including North and South America, Africa, Oceania and Asia.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Social Sciences;PDE; World Engagement: CV
  • Prerequisite: prior course work in Anthropology or Environmental Studies required
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Dobkins, Staff

ANTH 356 Language and Culture (4)

This course introduces students to the major issues and methodologies in the study of language in its cultural context. In particular, the course focuses on linguistic questions related to the following: 1) gender; 2) power; 3) ethnic, racial, and national identifies; 4) literacy; 5) poetic, verbal performance; and 6) intercultural communication. Analysis often centers on video and cassette texts from films, conversations, and the students' own fieldwork data.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Social Sciences; World Engagement: CV
  • Prerequisite: Previous coursework in Anthropology recommended
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Wogan

ANTH 358 Special Topics in Anthropology (4)

This course provides the flexibility to offer special topics of interest in anthropology. The course may study a particular subfield of anthropology, or a particular anthropological problem in depth.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Social Sciences
  • Prerequisite: ANTH 150 or consent of instructor
  • Offering: As Appropriate
  • Instructor: Staff

ANTH 371W Survey of Anthropological Theory (4)

This course surveys the history of anthropological theory, with an emphasis upon contemporary schools and movements within the discipline. Topics range from the nineteenth-century intellectual history of the discipline to current trends and critiques in anthropology. Appropriate for students of anthropology and others interested in cultural studies or theory in the social sciences.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Social Sciences
  • Prerequisite: ANTH 150 plus one other Anthropology course, Junior or Senior status
  • Offering: Fall semester
  • Instructor: Staff

ANTH 394 Internship in Anthropology (1-4)

This course provides an opportunity for practical experience (minimum 12 hours per week) in an off-campus setting related to the study of anthropology and to the student's emerging research and professional interests. The student will be supervised by an on-site professional as well as a faculty member. A paper, journal, and periodic consultations with the faculty member are required. The course does not fulfill the senior experience requirement.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Social Sciences
  • Prerequisite: The internship is open to advanced majors in anthropology only; completion of ANTH 371W is recommended.
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

ANTH 399 Topics in Anthropology (1-4)

A semester-long study of topics in Anthropology. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and Topics Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Instructor: Staff

ANTH 429 Topics in Anthropology (1-4)

A semester-long study of topics in Anthropology. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. See the New and Topics Courses page on the Registrar’s webpage for descriptions and applicability to majors/minors in other departments.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Instructor: Staff

ANTH 490 Independent Study (2 or 4)

This course provides the opportunity to conduct a major research project which cannot otherwise be pursued through any existing course in the department's curriculum. Students must have standing in anthropology and will work under faculty supervision. This course cannot replace ANTH 499W Senior Seminar.

  • Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Staff

ANTH 499W Senior Research Methods Seminar (4)

Provides intensive training in ethnographic methods. Topics include ethics, rapport, gathering and recording data (focusing upon techniques of participant-observation and interviewing), qualitative analysis, and the writing of ethnography. Each student will design and carry out an independent, semester-long field research project, resulting in a final paper. Fulfills the Senior Experience requirement for Anthropology majors.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Social Sciences
  • Prerequisite: ANTH 371W and senior standing in Anthropology
  • Offering: Spring semester
  • Instructor: Dobkins, Millen, Wogan

ANTH 499H Senior Honors Seminar (4)

Senior Honors Seminar provides anthropology majors the option of extending their required ANTH 499W Senior Research Methods Seminar for a full year in order to complete a more ambitious and rigorous senior project utilizing ethnographic methods. Enrollment is by application only, and accepted students will be expected to attend an additional semester of ANTH 499W Senior Research Methods Seminar to receive guidance and to provide peer mentoring for other anthropology majors.

  • Prerequisite: ANTH 499W and application
  • Offering: Application
  • Instructor: Dobkins, Millen, Wogan

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