Music

The Willamette University music department offers students a program of rigorous and intensive training in specialized music disciplines combined with music core courses in theory, history and literature all within a broad spectrum of courses in other liberal arts disciplines. For the major and non-major alike, the department offers music study and performance through individual instruction, chamber music, large ensembles and general music courses, many of which meet the fine arts requirement of Willamette University's general education program.

The Mary Stuart Rogers Music Center houses the 450-seat Jerry E. Hudson Concert Hall, a rehearsal hall, percussion studio, keyboard lab, faculty teaching studios, practice rooms and the music department administrative offices. The adjoining Smith Fine Arts Building houses rehearsal rooms, music classrooms, faculty studios and offices, practice rooms, and the 1250-seat G. Herbert Smith Auditorium. A tracker-action organ is housed in the Cone Chapel located in Waller Hall while Hudson Hall features a Hamburg Steinway concert grand piano and a digital electronic organ. The music section of the University library contains a comprehensive and up-to-date collection of music scores, books, microfilm, CDs, videotapes, DVD's and archival recordings. Ford Hall houses a 15 workstation Digital Music Studio and a recording studio.

Admission, Scholarships and Financial Aid

Music scholarships, and other forms of institutional financial aid are available to entering students. Music students applying for admission are encouraged to audition before members of the music faculty for a music scholarship. If an applicant is unable to appear in person, a compact disc recording of a performance may be sent instead of the personal audition and interview.

Student employment opportunities under the Federal Work-Study program also are available to music students. These opportunities include working in the Music Office and various secretarial and clerical jobs for music faculty. Information regarding employment may be obtained from the Music Department Chair or the Director of Student Financial Aid.

Concerts and Recitals

The Music Department presents a regular series of concerts and recitals performed by university ensembles, students and faculty. Music students and faculty engage in extensive concert activities both on and off campus. The major performing ensembles of the department tour regularly throughout the Northwest, California and Canada.

Guest artists with the Grace Goudy Distinguished Artists Series perform and present master classes on campus. The New Music at Willamette Series offers concerts organized by the Swindells Composer-in-Residence. In addition, the Music Department sponsors a weekly student recital to provide students with an opportunity to perform before faculty and peers and to experience repertoire from various media and music history periods. All music majors are encouraged to perform in these recitals. All performance majors are required to do so at least once each semester except for the first semester. All music events are open to the public and music majors are required to attend 15 performances per semester.

Music Lessons

Applied music lessons are available in all band and orchestral instruments as well as in piano, voice and guitar. Prior to the beginning of classes in the fall semester, students may audition for placement in the studios of the various applied music teachers. There are special instructional and studio fees for this individual instruction billed to the student account for each semester of study (Fee info here). For more information on lessons and the applied lesson faculty, see the music department web pages.

Music Ensembles

The following music ensembles are open by audition to all Willamette students regardless of major:

  • Chamber Choir
  • Chamber Music Ensembles
  • Dramatic Vocal Arts Ensemble
  • Willamette Jazz Collective
  • Small Jazz Ensembles
  • Male Ensemble Willamette
  • University Chamber Orchestra
  • Voce Femminile
  • Waller String Quartet
  • Willamette Singers (Vocal Jazz Ensemble)
  • Wind Ensemble

Music majors are required to participate in an ensemble every semester. Policies and specific requirements for the B.M. degree (Performance, Composition) or the B.A. degree are outlined in the Music Student Handbook. This handbook is distributed to all music students at the beginning of every year. Any student contemplating a major in music is strongly urged to read the handbook thoroughly and contact the Music Department Chair before registering. Students may also contact the Music Department directly to obtain a copy of the music handbook.

Degree Programs

For Music majors the following degree programs are available:

Bachelor of Arts in Music

The Bachelor of Arts degree for music majors is designed for those students wishing to major in music while simultaneously taking a broader spectrum of elective and general courses in the College of Arts & Sciences. See the catalog section which describes the B.A. degree and its requirements. For this degree at least 20 credits other than music must be earned for graduation. Music requirements for this degree appear later in the music section.

Double Degrees in Music and Liberal Arts

Some students may wish to earn a B.A. degree in music as well as a second B.A. in another discipline. It is important for such a student to consult the catalog section on double degrees and the Registrar's Office for information regarding the specific requirements which must be met to earn both degrees.

Instrumental Proficiency Requirement for Music Majors

No later than the end of the junior year all candidates for music degrees (other than performance) must demonstrate instrumental, or vocal proficiency equivalent to that normally expected after three or four years of advanced private study. A minimum of one year of study at Willamette on that instrument must precede the satisfaction of this requirement. (Performance majors should see "Performance Related Requirements" section in the music handbook.) Proficiency requirements are satisfied by a performance for a faculty jury or in a student recital. Memory and repertoire requirements for each degree program are outlined in the Music Student Handbook.

Senior Projects and Senior Recitals

During the senior year, each music major must satisfactorily complete a Senior Project, a Senior Seminar or present a Senior Recital, depending upon the degree sought.

The various majors satisfy this requirement as follows: Performance Majors - a Senior Recital; Composition Majors - a Senior Composition Project. Each student majoring in Music under the Bachelor of Arts program must complete either a Senior Recital or a Senior Research Paper.

All music majors must satisfy a set of basic music requirements as well as an additional set of requirements specific to each degree program. In addition, all degree candidates must satisfy the University's General Education Program. Bachelor of Music degree candidates are exempted from the portion of the General Education Program requiring study in a language other than English except as noted in the Voice Performance degree. Bachelor of Arts in Music degree candidates must fulfill the language requirement.

Note: Variable credit is given for Music 170, 270, 370 and 470: Applied Instrumental and Vocal Instruction (.25, .5, or 1). Performance majors take a one-hour lesson each week and are required to practice a greater number of hours weekly. Performance majors receive .5 credit for a one-hour lesson for the first two years of study. Upon passing the Qualifying Recital (by the end of the sophomore year) performance majors receive 1 credit for a one-hour lesson during the last two years of study. Non-performance majors who take a one-hour lesson per week earn .5 credit. Those non-performance majors who take a one-half hour lesson per week earn .25 credit.


Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Music Degree (12 credits)

University General Education Requirements

For this degree, at least 19 credits other than music must be earned for graduation.

Core Courses (7.5 credits)

  • MUSC 161 Musicianship I (1)
  • MUSC 162 Musicianship II (1)
  • MUSC 242 Music History I (1)
  • MUSC 343 Music History II (1)
  • MUSC 495 Senior Project (.5)
  • MUSE 160X Rhythm Workshop (.25)
  • MUSE 0--X Ensemble (1.75) *except for MUSE 099X
  • MUSL 370 Applied Lessons (1)
  • MUS-RECIT Music Convocation (0 cr)
  • Piano Proficiency Exam (0 cr)

Additional Music Theory (1)

Structured Electives (3.5) (at least three credits must be at the 300-level or higher and include a W class)

  • MUSC 207 Improvisation I: Free (1)
  • MUSC 212 Jazz: America and Beyond (1)
  • MUSC 266 Diction for Singers I (.5)
  • MUSC 267 Diction for Singers II (.5)
  • MUSC 314 Knowing the Score: A History of Music for Film (1)
  • MUSC 318W Beethoven, His Legacy and the Power of Music (1)
  • MUSC 331W Advanced Topics in Music Theory and Analysis (1)
  • MUSC 339 Desktop Music Production (1)
  • MUSC 340 Composition and Orchestration (1)
  • MUSC 345 Conducting (1)
  • MUSC 351 Vocal Pedagogy (.5)
  • MUSC 390 Independent Study (.5 or 1)
  • MUSC 425 Recording Studio Music Production (1)
  • MUSC 445 Topics in Music History (1)
  • MUSC 490 Independent Study (.5 or 1)

Requirements for the Music Minor (5 Credits)

The Minor Program in Music consists of 5 credits in Music chosen from the following courses in consultation with the Music Department.

Core requirements (2)

Structured electives (1.5)

Lessons (1)

Ensemble (.5)

Must be in one ensemble

Indicators of Achievement

The National Association of Schools of Music (NASM), our accreditation and standards organization, recognizes a body of knowledge and skills common to all baccalaureate degrees in music. This core includes:

  • Performance
  • Musicianship Skills and Analysis
  • Composition and Improvisation
  • History and Repertory
  • Technology
  • Synthesis

Student Learning Outcomes for the Music Major

  1. Performance skills
    • Technical skills requisite for artistic self-expression in at least one major performance area
    • An overview understanding of the repertory in the major performance area
    • The ability to read at sight with fluency
    • Rehearsal and conducting skills
    • Keyboard competency
  2. Musicianship skills and analysis
    • An understanding of the common elements and organizational patterns of music and their interaction, the ability to employ this understanding in aural, verbal, and visual analyses
    • The ability to take aural dictation
    • Sufficient understanding of and capability with musical forms, processes, and structures to use this knowledge and skill in compositional, performance, analytical, scholarly, and pedagogical applications according to the requisites of their specializations
    • The ability to place music in historical, cultural, and stylistic contexts
  3. Composition and Improvisation
    • Sufficient understanding of the tools necessary to create music both extemporaneously and in written form
    • The ability to demonstrate a basic command of compositional process and design
    • The ability to demonstrate a basic command of creative improvisational process
    • The ability to engage in the process of realizing composed and improvised work through collaborative performance
  4. History and Repertory
    • A thorough knowledge of the output of significant composers from each major musical period including the present
    • An understanding of the stylistic traits of each period including principal characteristics of major composers and significant musical genres of each era
    • An understanding of the culture of each musical period—i.e. the political, social and artistic contexts in which music was created
    • A knowledge of the primary sources of music historical writing, critical commentary and analysis
  5. Technology
    • The ability to use technologies current to their area of specialization
    • The ability to use contemporary music notation software
  6. Synthesis
    • The ability, by the end of undergraduate study, to work on musical problems by combining, as appropriate to each situation, their capabilities in performance; aural and visual analysis; composition and improvisation; history and repertory; and technology

Faculty

  • Marva Duerksen, Department Chair, Associate Professor of Music, Women's and Gender Studies; Coordinator, Musicianship
  • Héctor Agüero, Associate Professor of Music, University Chamber Orchestra & Wind Ensemble
  • Jean-David Coen, Artist-in-Residence, Artistic Director of the Grace Goudy Distinguished Artists Series
  • James Miley, Associate Professor of Music, Director of Jazz Studies
  • Mike Nord, Irene Gerlinger Swindells Professor of Music, Music Technology, Improvisation & Jazz Studies
  • Wallace Long Jr., Visiting Professor of Choral Music,
  • Katherine Skovira, Zeller Chair in Opera Studies, Director of Voice Studies, Director of Dramatic Vocal Arts

Instructional Staff

Artist Associates


Course Listings

MUSC 111 Basics of Singing (.5)

This course is designed to help students develop greater confidence and skill as a singer. The class is geared toward the beginning who is interested in learning the basics of healthy vocal technique. All singing styles and genres are welcomed. Students will learn and perform songs both alongside and in front of their classmates in a positive, encouraging environment. No musical training is required.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Students without any musical training may prefer to start by taking MUSC 160
  • Offering: Alternate years, Spring
  • Instructor: Engbretson

MUSC 121 Creating Music with Technology (1)

Creating music offers insights into the composer's art and a means of personal expression. Current technology allows the opportunity to compose music even for those without traditional skills or training. Intended for the non-music major, this hands-on class will directly involve students in the creation and recording of original music and sound resources. Final project recordings will be presented in a virtual concert.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Students should have basic computing and computer file management skills
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Nord, Miley

MUSC 138 A World of Development: An Introduction to Western Classical Music (1)

This introductory course is designed to give students a deeper understanding of Western classical music by studying different musical styles and trends from each major time period. It will increase students’ grasp of musical fundamentals and structure as well as enhance their powers of aural perception. Students will learn the basic elements of Music, understand some common musical forms and be able to distinguish some of the differences in the masterworks of major composers. No musical background is required. Given the range of subject matter this course shall not attempt an exhaustive survey but students will learn about the variety of music in its evolving historical and cultural context, to enjoy it, to get inside it, and to focus on developing listening skills. Discussion of the ways in which the music of other cultures have influenced both historical and modern trends will also be pursued.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Coen

MUSC 140 Class Piano I (.5)

Let’s make music together! This is a course designed for students with little to no piano background wanting to further explore keyboard music. Students will learn reading on the grand staff, ensemble playing, keyboard technique and theory, and perform repertoire from the jazz, pop and classical styles.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Zimmerman

MUSC 160 Fundamentals of Music Literacy (1)

Introduction to the Fundamentals of Music intended for those students with little or no background in music. The course covers such topics as treble and bass clefs, major and minor scales, simple and compound meters, triads and seventh chords, and elementary counterpoint. Composition and in-class performance is emphasized.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Gulua

MUSC 161 Musicianship I (1)

Review of the rudiments of music, including clefs, notations, meters and their signatures, key signatures, scales, intervals, triads, and seventh chords. Two-voice composition; triads and seventh chords; the basic phrase model; chorale harmonization and figured bass; leading-tone, predominant, and 6/4 chords; tonic expansions, root progressions, and the mediant triad; the interaction of melody and harmony; and cadences. Laboratory.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: by placement or MUSC 160
  • Offering: Fall semester
  • Instructor: Duerksen

MUSC 162 Musicianship II (1)

The course content will include: diatonic sequences, secondary dominants, phrase rhythm, and motivic analysis, tonicization of scale degrees other than V, modulation to closely related keys, binary and ternary forms. Laboratory.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 161
  • Offering: Spring semester
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSC 180 Class Piano II (.5)

The course is designed for those who have successfully completed MUSC 140 or have attained a similar level of proficiency. Emphasis will be on music reading skills and basic keyboarding technique. The laboratory instructional context is reinforced by performance-based assessment.

Using the piano lab in a group setting, this course teaches students to read the grand staff more fluently, effectively learn ensemble music, and to play piano repertoire with appropriate technique, in addition to the exploration of sight reading and keyboard theory. Class Piano is paced for the motivated student. More advanced students will be given supplemental repertoire and technique.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 140
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Zimmerman

MUSC 190 Independent Study (.5 or 1)

Independent study in a course of one's choice. To be used at the discretion of an individual professor in order to fulfill a student's graduation requirements or to satisfy a student's interests. Such an option will usually be open only to seniors.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSC 199 Topics in Music (.25-1)

A semester-long study of topics in Music. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

MUSC 207 Improvisation I: Free (1)

Improvisation is an approach to music making that crosses boundaries of medium, style, and culture from rock to raga, jazz to new music. With a focus on free and semi-structured approaches, this class will experiment with a range of musical elements and ideas through hands-on improvisational performance. Interactive improvising with other art forms will also be explored. All instrumentalists/vocalists are welcome. No prior improvisational experience is necessary.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
  • Offering: Spring, Alternate years
  • Instructor: Nord

MUSC 212 Jazz: America and Beyond (1)

This course will present an overview of the evolution, contexts, and creative processes behind the artistry of Jazz music and musicians. Primary focus will be on the recordings of seminal artists. Concert attendance and in-class guest performers will offer additional opportunity for insight into the unique process engaged in improvisational creation. Reading and discussion will offer additional perspectives on the music and the musicians who make it. Students will synthesize these elements, constructing their own understanding of Jazz music and it many dimensions.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Nord, Miley

MUSC 214 Knowing the Score: A History of Music for Film (1)

This course provides a historical overview of music for film, beginning with the earliest attempts to apply sound to moving pictures in the late 1800s through the present day. Particular attention will be given to major stylistic trends and musical developments across the years as they relate to film scoring as a vital and constantly evolving form of artistic expression.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Miley

MUSC 218 Beethoven, His Legacy and the Power of Music (1)

For two centuries, Beethoven has been received and interpreted as the composer who liberated music, and the composer of revolution. Born at a pivotal point in European social and music history, he took the conventions of the ‘classical’ style and molded them into the beginnings of Romanticism in music. The discussions and writing surrounding the reception of his music shaped an entire discourse, often contentious, regarding the true nature of music, and whether it has the possibility to convey meaning. This class will combine elements of a music appreciation course, which deepens our awareness of the way the human experience is reflected in music, along with developing the necessary listening skills to grasp the subtlety of Beethoven’s compositional process. To underscore the universality of rhythm, melody, harmony, structure, and the ways in which these interdependent elements are negotiated, musical examples of many cultures, genres, styles, and historic periods will also be examined.. Concert attendance will be strongly encouraged, if not required. A love for, and curiosity about, music will make the experience more gratifying.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Coen

MUSC 242 Music History I (1)

Survey of Music History from Antiquity music to 20th Century. An introduction and overview of the history of Western Music, basic terminology, the development of musical styles in various historical eras, and the contributions of significant composers. Lectures and presentations supplemented by score study, performance and critical listening.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 162 or MUSC 133 and MUSC 134
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Agüero

MUSC 245 The Recording Studio Revolution (1)

The recording studio and audio recording technology have revolutionized the way we create, judge, learn, and even define music. Once exclusively the means to document a live performance, studio practice and multitrack technologies have evolved to become the means to compose and produce original music track by track. This class will trace the history of audio recording technology and recording studio practice through readings and listening. Examples will range from the earliest jazz and classical music recordings, to the first sampling and electronic music recordings of the 1940s, to the revolutionary recordings made by Les Paul, Jimi Hendrix, and the Beatles, to contemporary rock, pop, and hip-hop productions.

  • General Education Requirement: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Nord

MUSC 261 Musicianship III (1)

Topics include: Modal mixture chromatic mediants and submediants, the Neapolitan and augmented sixths, popular song and art song, variation and rondo, sonata form, advanced chromaticism. Laboratory.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 162
  • Offering: Fall semester
  • Instructor: Duerksen

MUSC 265 Jazz Harmony and Repertoire (1)

Continuing studies in improvisational music and jazz performance practice. Course focuses on understanding chord/scale relationships, exploration of melodic, motivic, and rhythmic improvisational practice, transcription and performance of important recorded improvisations, and developing fluency in jazz language through analysis and memorization of notable jazz standards representing a variety of common song forms. Students will apply theory to their own voice or instrument.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 162
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Miley

MUSC 266 Diction for Singers I (.5)

Principles of English and Italian phonetics for singing. Learning to apply the International Phonetic Alphabet to song texts in each language.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Fall, Alternate years
  • Instructor: Skovira

MUSC 267 Diction for Singers II (.5)

Principles of French and German phonetics for singing. Learning to apply the International Phonetic Alphabet to song texts in each language.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Spring, Alternate years
  • Instructor: Skovira

MUSC 281 Opera: Gender, Sexuality, "Others" (1)

In this course we will examine operas from the 17th century to the present day to gain an understanding of the historical and cultural conditions in which operas have been composed and staged, and to examine recurring themes developed in these works. Topics to be selected from: the impact of star performers (castrati and divas); character types (courtesans); constructions of exotic “others”; and the world of contemporary opera composition and performance, with a focus on works by composers from historically underrepresented groups. Prior musical experience beneficial though not required.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Duerksen

MUSC 290 Independent Study (.5 or 1)

Independent study in a course of one's choice. To be used at the discretion of an individual professor in order to fulfill a student's graduation requirements or to satisfy a student's interests. Such an option will usually be open only to seniors.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSC 299 Topics in Music (.25-1)

A semester-long study of topics in Music. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

MUSC 314 Knowing the Score: A History of Music for Film (1)

This course provides a historical overview of music for film, beginning with the earliest attempts to apply sound to moving pictures in the late 1800s through the present day. Particular attention will be given to major stylistic trends and musical developments across the years as they relate to film scoring as a vital and constantly evolving form of artistic expression. This 300-level section is intended for Music majors. Students taking this course will meet concurrently with MUSC 214, and will complete additional research projects via writing assignments and creative work in the Ford Hall digital music lab.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 162, MUSC 339
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Miley

MUSC 318W Beethoven, His Legacy and the Power of Music (1)

For two centuries, Beethoven has been received and interpreted as the composer who liberated music, and as the composer of revolution. The discussions and writing surrounding the reception of his music, from other artists and intellectual luminaries, shaped the entire narrative regarding the true nature of music as an art, and whether it had the possibility to convey meaning. The structures developed by his generation still dominate composition. Students taking this course which is co-listed with MUSC 218 will engage with the topic in a more rigorous fashion through the completion of 3 writing projects and one oral presentations.

Discussion and study of Beethoven: the composers of the period, the structures and syntax created, along the growing discourse of the 19th century over the absolute v.s. program music paradox, all satisfy the normal requirements of a topics in music history course.

The papers will extend from the analysis of one work which epitomizes the type of larger structure which became so dominant during the period to a paper which allows the study to correlate a feature of classical style composition with a technique developed later in 19-21st century composition.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Coen

MUSC 331W Advanced Topics in Music Theory and Analysis (1)

In this course students will apply the analytical techniques mastered in Theory III and IV to a few select works that will be studied in depth. The aim of the course is to enhance the understanding of musical style as it applies to individual composers and to musical periods, to engage historical and modern-day music-theoretical and musicological writings relevant to these composers and their works, and to hone students' writing skills in the context of musical analysis.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Writing-centered; Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 261 or MUSC 265
  • Offering: Alternate springs
  • Instructor: Duerksen

MUSC 339 Desktop Music Production (1)

Students will explore DAW-based desktop music production techniques through their application to creative projects. These techniques will include virtual instrument sequencing, multimedia sound design and scoring, synthesis, signal processing, and mixing. Collaborative projects across media will be a prominent feature of the class.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Music Major
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Nord

MUSC 340 Composition and Orchestration (1)

This course will focus on applying compositional techniques and processes to original student works scored for different combinations of instruments (strings, woodwinds, brass, and percussion) and voices. Students will analyze form and language in tonal and atonal music, learn to understand and apply select modern contemporary compositional techniques (such as set theory, serial process, minimalism, and spatial notation) through regular composition assignments, as well as study the scores of master works in the classical and jazz idioms to learn methods of orchestration. The final project is a fully prepared score and set of parts for an original work for large ensembles.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 162
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Miley

MUSC 343 Music History II (1)

Examination of 20th century art music from the western canon. On a rotating basis, topical foci may include electronic and electro-acoustic music, symphonic and large ensemble concert music, opera and vocal music, chamber music, and music from historically under-represented groups. Lectures and presentations supplemented by score study, critical listening, readings in contemporaneous literature, lab work, criticism and cultural history.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 242
  • Offering: Annually
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSC 345 Conducting (1)

Conducting technique, score preparation, rehearsal technique and expressive ensemble conducting. Students gain the necessary skills to effectively communicate musical ideas to their ensembles.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 162
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Agüero

MUSC 351 Vocal Pedagogy (.5)

This course will examine the anatomy and physiology of the vocal instrument and study the history, theory, and practice of the teaching of singing in Western music. Direct observation of Willamette University voice faculty in studio lessons will be included in the course activities, which will culminate in the practical teaching experience of a series of lessons given by students.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSL 170, MUSL 270 (four semesters of private voice instruction)
  • Offering: On demand
  • Instructor: Engbretson

MUSC 390 Independent Study (.5 or 1)

Independent study in a course of one's choice. To be used at the discretion of an individual professor in order to fulfill a student's graduation requirements or to satisfy a student's interests. Such an option will usually be open only to seniors.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSC 399 Topics in Music (.25-1)

A semester-long study of topics in Music. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

MUSC 425 Recording Studio Music Production (1)

This course will focus on audio recording and mixing technique in a DAW-based studio environment. Through a series of hands-on recording sessions, critical listening exercises, and readings students will develop competency in a range of techniques. These competencies will then be applied to each student’s independent production of an audio portfolio CD. Students can also expect a number of collaborative projects across disciplines with a view towards developing competencies applicable to the range of media production settings.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 121 or MUSC 339
  • Offering: Spring, Alternate years
  • Instructor: Nord

MUSC 429 Topics in Music (.25-1)

A semester-long study of topics in Music. Topics and emphases will vary according to the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Topic dependent
  • Prerequisite: Topic dependent
  • Offering: Occasionally
  • Professor: Staff

MUSC 445 Topics in Music History (1)

Advanced study in music history, topics ranging from a specialized course in one composer (eg. Stravinsky), period (eg. late nineteenth-century), genre (eg. symphony), syntax and style (eg. serialism of the 1950's) or combination of these elements (eg. romantic opera from Weber to Wagner). Faculty and student interests and needs will determine specific content.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 343
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Duerksen

MUSC 490 Independent Study (.5 or 1)

Independent study in a course of one's choice. To be used at the discretion of an individual professor in order to fulfill a student's graduation requirements or to satisfy a student's interests. Such an option will usually be open only to seniors.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSC 495 Senior Project (.5)

Senior music majors will complete a summative project to review by a faculty committee. The project may be a recital, a large-scale composition, a studio production with supporting materials, or a research thesis paper. In each case the work is proposed, planned, and completed in consultation with sponsoring faculty member(s).

  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSC 496 Senior Recital (.5)

Preparation by all Bachelor of Music candidates in Performance, and by other suitable candidates, of representative works from all appropriate major stylistic periods. Required of all Performance Majors.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Offering: Infrequently; Phasing out
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSE 029X University Chamber Orchestra (.25)

The UCO presents two full concert programs each academic year including both chamber and symphonic works. Artist-mentors from the Oregon Symphony and Willamette faculty play alongside students in the annual fall concert and winners from the annual Concerto-Aria Soloists Competition are featured in the spring concert. In addition, the orchestra collaborates with the Dramatic Vocal Arts in the spring semester for an opera production.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Open to all students by audition
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Agüero

MUSE 031X Jazz Ensemble (.25)

The Willamette Jazz Collective is the premiere instrumental jazz ensemble at Willamette University. Comprising a full rhythm section with six to eight melodic instruments (winds/strings), this select group of 12 to 14 musicians performs compositions and arrangements from across the full spectrum of jazz, ranging from the music of Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus to modern works by John Hollenbeck and Maria Schneider. In addition to a creative focus on high level ensemble communication and improvisation, the WJC places special emphasis on the music of today, with frequent premieres of original works by emerging jazz composers, unique re-imaginings of popular songs from other genres and compositions and arrangements by Willamette University students.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Open to qualified instrumentalists by audition
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Miley

MUSE 032X Wind Ensemble (.25)

The Willamette University Wind Ensemble is a large wind and percussion ensemble. The ensemble performs music from a wide variety of styles, time periods, and traditions and gives two or three public concerts per semester. The Wind Ensemble is open to all students regardless of academic concentration.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Agüero

MUSE 034X Dramatic Vocal Arts (.25)

This workshop offers students a rich experience with opera, and an in-depth integration of stage movement, character analysis and vocal skill. The Dramatic Vocal Arts presents two productions during the school year. One evening of operatic scenes with piano accompaniment is performed during the fall semester, and one fully staged, costumed production with orchestral accompaniment is presented during the spring semester. In this class, students develop the skills needed to pursue a professional career. Recent productions include Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro, Puccini’s Suor Angelica, Die Fledermaus, by Johann Strauss, Mozart’s Cosi fan Tutte, Our Town by Ned Rorem, and Hansel and Gretel by Humperdinck.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Open by audition
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Skovira

MUSE 036X Chamber Music (.25)

The coaching and performing of major works from the chamber music literature, with emphasis on rehearsal technique and small ensemble skills. Typical chamber groups are: Flute Choir, Trumpet Choir, Trombone Choir, Woodwind Quartet, Waller String Quartet, Brass Quintet, and Small Jazz Ensemble. Other chamber groups may be created depending on the availability of qualified instrumentalists. May be repeated for credit.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSE 037X Willamette Singers (.25)

Exploration of vocal jazz literature for small groups. Performs both on and off campus; in some years a concert tour is taken. May be repeated for credit.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Open to qualified musicians by audition
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSE 040X Chamber Choir (.25)

Exploration of choral literature for mixed voices from the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Contemporary style periods, including both unaccompanied and instrumentally accompanied works. In some years a concert tour is taken. May be repeated for credit.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Open to advanced musicians by audition
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Engbretson

MUSE 043X Voce (.25)

Exploration of a wide variety of choral literature suitable for treble range voices. Particular attention will be given to the development of vocal technique and musicianship. May be repeated for credit.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Open to qualified musicians by audition
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Engbretson

MUSE 044X Vox (.25)

Exploration of a wide variety of choral literature suitable for bass/tenor range voices. Particular attention will be given to the development of vocal technique and musicianship. May be repeated for credit.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: Open to qualified musicians by audition
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Klemme

MUSE 099X Seminar in the Art of Piano Accompanying (.25)

The study of the art of piano accompanying. Emphasis on sight reading and the development of the listening and interpreting skills necessary for successful ensemble performance. Weekly seminar which includes live performances by students, lectures, discussions and assigned listening. May be repeated for credit.

  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Coen

MUSE 102X Coordinate Movement for Musicians (.25)

This course is designed for students interested in exploring movement as it relates to playing a musical instrument, singing or acting. Students will learn Body Mapping, a method for improving coordination. Participants gain ease in performing, learn how improved coordination enables them to better avoid fatigue, injury and technical limitation, and thereby be able to more completely realize their musical and artistic intentions.

  • Prerequisite: Experience with singing or playing an instrument (need not be advanced)
  • Offering: Alternate years
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSE 160X Rhythm Workshop (.25)

An exploration of the various components of the rhythmic language in western and world musics, culminating in a public performance featuring both pre-composed and improvised works. Meets two hours per week. Required of all music majors and minors.

  • Offering: Fall Semester
  • Instructor: Miley

MUSL 170 Applied Instrumental and Vocal Instruction (.25 or .5)

First year development of applied instrumental and vocal skills, starting with the student's level of attainment. May be repeated for credit.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSC 111; consent of instructor
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSL 270 Applied Instrumental and Vocal Instruction (.25 or .5)

Second year development of applied instrumental and vocal skills, starting with the student's level of attainment. May be repeated for credit.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSL 170; consent of instructor
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSL 370 Applied Instrumental and Vocal Instruction (.25 or .5 or 1)

Second year development of applied instrumental and vocal skills, starting with the student's level of attainment. May be repeated for credit.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSL 270; consent of instructor
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

MUSL 470 Applied Instrumental and Vocal Instruction (.25 or .5 or 1)

Second year development of applied instrumental and vocal skills, starting with the student's level of attainment. May be repeated for credit.

  • General Education Requirement Fulfillment: Arts & Humanities
  • Prerequisite: MUSL 370; consent of instructor
  • Offering: Every semester
  • Instructor: Staff

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