Student Research

Student research opportunities, both collaborative and independent are infused throughout our curriculum.

All majors will complete two Research Intensive courses centered around one or several research questions for which students will develop hypotheses, collect, analyze, and interpret a data set, and write up their findings. Other opportunities for research include independent study with faculty on a topic of mutual interest and the Honor Thesis. In addition, there are several ways to be involved in research on campus (see below).

The ENVS department has a strong history of and ongoing commitment to externally funded initiatives supporting and advancing faculty and student research (Luce Foundation, American Chemical Society, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Wiener Foundation, Kress Foundation, American Political Science Association, Association of American Geographers), research and educational facilities (Keck Lab, Murdock Foundation), student scholarships (Dempsey Foundation, Webber), endowed chair and lecture series (Dempsey Foundation), and curriculum development (National Association of Geoscience Teachers).

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The objective of the Science Collaborative Research Program (SCRP) is to provide selected undergraduate students the opportunity to work directly with faculty in the natural sciences on a nine-week summer research project. A $5,500 stipend is provided to participating students.

Visit the SCRP website

The National Science Foundation makes possible a number of opportunities for undergraduates to join research projects each summer. This allows students to experience first-hand how basic research is carried out, and to contribute consequentially. The principal support by NSF of such activities is through the Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program.

More information about REUs

The three-year pilot phase (2010-2013) of LARC demonstrated the pedagogical, creative, and scholarly value of undergraduate students and faculty working together in interdisciplinary research communities during the summer. LARC 2.0 extends research experiences throughout the curriculum so that Willamette students regularly find research opportunities with faculty in their classrooms and are well prepared to do research in their senior year. LARC 2.0 has two major components: Summer Research Communities and Curricular Innovation.

Visit the LARC website

Carson Grants offer Willamette undergraduates the opportunity to undertake a scholarly, creative, or professional research project during the summer. Approximately 10 grants of up to $3,000 are available each year. Students may apply for these competitive grants either as sophomores or juniors. Projects may be creative and artistic, literary, investigative, interdisciplinary, and performative.

More information about Carson Grants

College Colloquium Student Research Grants offer Willamette undergraduates the opportunity to undertake a scholarly, creative, or professional research project during the summer between their first and second years. Approximately six grants of up to $3,500 are available each year. Students may apply for these competitive grants only as first-year students. Projects must be related to the subject of the applicant's College Colloquium. Projects may be creative and artistic, literary, investigative, interdisciplinary, and performative.

More information about Colloquium Grants